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Each child is to use a scissors. How many scissors should there be for this row of children? (page 19, Making Number Discoveries, written by Leo J. Brueckner et al., published by Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.

In the above passage, "scissors" is used as a countable noun whose plural form is the same as its singular form. Since the book is a math textbook for elementary school students, it is supposed to be standard usage, isn't it? If not, should I tell my students to avoid such usage?

PS. I am a Taiwanese teacher of English.
Comments  
"Scissors" is a plural, you can't say "a scissors", it should be "a pair of scissors". Yet you can say "Could you pass me the/those scissors, please." (from Cambridge)

I guess "how many /pairs of/ scissors" is correct.
Hi guys,

I think 'a scissors' is accepted, or at least said, in American English.

Best wishes, Clive
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"A scissors" is definitely not said in British English - it's "some scissors" or "a pair of scissors".
CliveI think 'a scissors' is accepted, or at least said, in American English.Yes, see in the New York Times:

IN PERSON; A Bag Lady With Panache

... tape gun and a scissors and gets some heavy work ...

February 6, 2005 - By JONATHAN MILLER (NYT) - New York and Region - News

"A scissors" is definitely not said in British English - it's "some scissors" or "a pair of scissors".
This applies to Helsinki English as well.Emotion: smile
CB
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Or even just "scissors" - "use scissors to cut that piece of paper"
Can we say "a pants (shorts, glasses, ...)" or "how many pants(shorts, glasses, ...)"? If not, scissors is an exception, isn't it?
Hi,

Yeah, when it's used, it's an exception. Some of these Americans are a wild and crazy bunch.Emotion: stick out tongue

Best wishes, again.
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