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Hi teachers,

Would you teach me how to recognize the word sequence if they are not fixed in English? Thanks.

1. A short quick break / A quick short break.

2. Here is what I don't understand; with different orders of "arrogant", "beautiful", "little", there could be a number of ways to describe the character mermaid.

2a. She is an arrogant beautiful little mermaid.

2b. She is a little arrogant beautiful mermaid.

2c. She is a beautiful little arrogant mermaid.

2d. She is an arrogant little beautiful mermaid.

2e. She is a little beautiful arrogant mermaid.

2f. She is a beautiful arrogant little mermaid.

Thank you.

Tinanam
Comments  
1. A quick break / A short break.

2. Here is what I don't understand; with different orders of "arrogant", "beautiful", "little", there could be a number of ways to describe the character mermaid.-- I have bolded what sounds most natural to me:

2a. She is an arrogant beautiful little mermaid.
2b. She is a little arrogant beautiful mermaid.
2c. She is a beautiful little arrogant mermaid.
2d. She is an arrogant little beautiful mermaid.
2e. She is a little beautiful arrogant mermaid.
2f. She is a beautiful arrogant little mermaid.

All I can say is that is that I avoided 'a little', since that also means 'not much'.
Hi Mister Micawber,

Thanks for your help.

Could I ask if the bold ones below have the same meaning?
Mister MicawberI have bolded what sounds most natural to me:

2a. She is an arrogant beautiful little mermaid.

2c. She is a beautiful little arrogant mermaid.

2f. She is a beautiful arrogant little mermaid.

If "little" being put in front of "beautiful" or "arrogant", does that mean it gives "less beautiful" and "less arrogant"? That's why I should avoid it. (This is a little mermaid I am intending to say)
Mister MicawberAll I can say is that is that I avoided 'a little', since that also means 'not much'.

Thank you so much.

Tinanam

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This is not easy to answer. 'Little' always refers to the mermaid in these sentences, I think, but 'little' does seem to stress (not minimize) the adjective that follows it over the other adjectives, I feel. 'Little' carries a bit of endearment with it, I suppose-- that is why it accentuates the following adjective as well as applies to the noun.
Hi Mister Micawber,

Would you also tell me if the sentences you bolded because they are natural to you are the same meaning?

Thank you.

Tinanam
I have already answered that as best I can. The adjectives take varying precedence, to my mind.
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Hi Mister Micawber,

I'm sorry that I might not understand it clearly. My grammar book mentions "the position of adjectives", and there are "gradable" and "ungradable" adjectives. "Gradable adjectives" usually precedes "Ungradable adjectives". When two gradable adjectives come before the noun, we can put either a comma or and between them.

- an attractive, big garden or -an attractive and big garden

Here's I don't understand. The example from the book below does not show either a comma or and . What makes the difference?

-Two large round wooden table (Two large, round wooden table)

And

Do I need to put comma in my little mermaid?

- She is a beautiful, arrogant little mermaid.

Thank you.

Tinanam