+0
Hi teachers,
I guess 'with clarity' could be a suitable synonym for 'clearly', if I'm not mistaken, but then what could possibly be a suitable synonym for 'quite' in the following sentence?

Halls saw the man quite clearly.

Thanks in advance.
1 2
Comments  
You cannot draw up a synonym with 'clearly' that can be used for 'with clarity'. However:

Halls saw the man quite/very/extremely clearly.
Halls saw the am with extreme clarity.
quite ~ completely; entirely
quite clearly ~ with complete clarity

That's the closest I can come to a rephrasing.

CJ
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
CalifJimquite ~ completely; entirely
I know this one meaning of the adverb "quite"; however, there is also another meaning which also occurs to me.

1) quite ~ completely; entirely
2) quite ~ fairly, pretty, rather, to some degree

How can I find out then if "quite" in this sentence stands for the first or the second meaning.

Note this:

"It is quite good." => Depending on the stress of different words in the sentence, "quite" can take both meanings, unless I am mistaken. How should a non-native speaker interpret such kind of adverb? Are two meanings of the adverb "quite" possible in the example given by Thinking Spain?
Marold2) quite ~ fairly, pretty, rather, to some degree
I don't use 'quite' this way, though I'm aware that some do.
MaroldHow can I find out then if "quite" in this sentence stands for the first or the second meaning.
In written form I don't suppose there is a way to know, but (obviously) I took it to have the first meaning in TS's sentence. I doubt that the second meaning is possible in that sentence.

I suspect that it always has the first meaning when accompanied by a negative.

not quite right ~ not completely right

It's the affirmative that is more problematic.
Marold"It is quite good."
This sounds to me like a typical use of the second meaning -- praise of some kind.

Sorry I couldn't help you more.

CJ
CalifJimnot quite right ~ not completely right
Does 'not quite right - not completely right' mean that it is NOT right AT ALL or that it is not completely/absolutely wrong and simultaneously not completely/absolutely right?
CalifJimI don't use 'quite' this way, though I'm aware that some do.
So what do you use then as an alternative for 'quite'? I assume synonyms 'fairly, pretty'?

By the way, the second meaning is also mentioned in the Oxford Advanced dictionary as a first one (I don't know whether dictionaries list the meanings according to their frequency).

The examples taken from Oxford in meaning 'fairly, pretty': "quite big/good/cold/warm/interesting"
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
CalifJimSorry I couldn't help you more.
You are of great help, not to worry.Emotion: smile Every your effort is appreciated which most of the time proves very useful!
MaroldDoes 'not quite right - not completely right' mean that it is NOT right AT ALL
No. The 'not' applies only to 'quite'. [ not quite ] [ right ].

It's not [ quite ] [ not right ], i.e., it's not [quite] [wrong].
Maroldor that it is not completely/absolutely wrong and simultaneously not completely/absolutely right?
So yes, it's this idea.
MaroldSo what do you use then as an alternative for 'quite'? I assume synonyms 'fairly, pretty'?
Right.
MaroldBy the way, the second meaning is also mentioned in the Oxford Advanced dictionary as a first one (I don't know whether dictionaries list the meanings according to their frequency).
Every dictionary seems to have different criteria for the order of listings. Many of them list the oldest definition first and the most modern definition last -- at least they used to. You need to consult the notes at the beginning of each dictionary to determine the answer to this one.
_________________

My take on this may be different from that of others. I think the word "quite" always 'really' means "entirely". It's just that when people use it to mean "somewhat" or "fairly", they are speaking insincerely. This sort of insincerity is regarded as harmless; it helps grease the wheels of social interaction. Emotion: smile

CJ
Hi Mister Micawber,
Thank you for your advice and examples. 'Quite' always drives me nuts.

TS
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more