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Which determiner can be used in the following sentences? 1. I'd like (a / some) coffee. 2. I'd like (a / the / some) tea with lemon. 3. Can I have (a / the / some) tea with milk? 4. Would you like (a / the / some / your) with lemon or milk?
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Which do you think, Alex?
I would say 'some', because they are uncountable nouns.
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Not always, Damir-- and uncountables can also take the definite article.
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Picture yourself in a restaurant. The server is standing at your elbow. You point to the menu and say, "...
I know that "milk" and "coffee" are uncountable nouns. So I would use "some".
1. I'd like some coffee.
2. I'd like some tea with lemon.
3. Can I have some tea with milk?

But I saw "a tea" that I think means "a cup of tea". But I'm not completely sure that these sentences would be correct.
1. I'd like a coffee.
2. I'd like a tea with lemon.
3. Can I have a tea with milk?

In the fourth sentence I would use "your".
4. Would you like your with lemon or milk?
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A tea is a cup of tea just as a coffee is a cup of coffee.

Three teas and three coffees, please.

4. Would you like (a / the / some / your) with lemon or milk?

Are you sure that you've typed sentence 4 correctly? To me, none of the words in the brackets can be used.
In the fourth sentence I would use "your".
4. Would you like your tea with lemon or milk?
Alex+In the fourth sentence I would use "your".
4. Would you like your tea with lemon or milk?
Your sentence has been amended. Yes, the word to use is 'your'.
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