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Hi,

I have asked for the names of the grammatical parts that suppose to be to-infinitives and the response I got was that they are to-infinitives. Do to-infinitives take appropriate parts in sentences and thus, have proper grammatical names,or could it be that the name "to-infinitive" is the name of a grammatical part. Confused.

Some entences I posted to ask for the names of parts:

Could you help me to look for the key?

I would like you to clean the room.

I saw the girl pour the water down the sink.
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The term 'names of parts' makes no sense to me.
Are you asking for "parts of speech"?
An infinitive is a verb. The part of speech is "verb".

I hope that helps.

CJ
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Thank you, CalifJim.

I meant to ask you for grammatical names of the underlined parts. You don't have to parse every thing but the underlined ones.

Could you help me to look for the key?

I would like you to clean the room.

I saw the girl pour the water down the sink.
Yes, but I'm still not sure what you mean by 'grammatical names'. I don't think there is any particular name to the parts that you have underlined. The first two are infinitive structures (with full infinitives). The third is also an infinitive structure, but with a bare infinitive instead of a full infinitive. But I don't think "infinitive structure" is necessarily the 'grammatical name' you are looking for.

to look = infinitive; verb form
for = preposition
the = determiner
key = noun
to clean = infinitive; verb form
room = noun
pour = verb
water = noun
down = preposition
sink = noun

CJ