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Dear teachers,

This following sentence sounds weird to me.

I can't find the Simpson will anywhere. I give up.

Why I think it's weird is that I can't find a verb between will and anywhere. Has it been omitted? What does the original sentence look like? Please advise.

LCChang
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Comments  
" will " is an offiical document in this sentence.
Can you explain your comment?

" will " is an offiical document in this sentence.

This is indeed a strange sentence! It will make a ilttle sense without the "will". The way it's written, it's not right.
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It means I can't find the will (the document that tells what Mr. Simpson wants done with his money and other belongings when he dies) belonging to Mr. Simpson,( i.e., the will that Mr. Simpson wrote).

"will" is a noun, not a verb here.

CJ
Oh! that "will". How about Simpson's will?

By the way, why do native speakers refer "official documents" to their wills? Kind of fun to me.

LcChang
Hello

I think "Mr. Simpson's" will better than "the Simpson's will" because it is not common to define a noun with two determiners ("the" and "Simpson's").

In the United States (and in Japan also) "a will" commonly should be a scripted document made in a way according to strict legal rules. If you are interested, take a look at [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_(law )] Wiki's explanation of "will".[/url]

paco
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Ok, I see.

Even without " 's ", does the original sentence " I can't find the Simpson will anywhere." still sound good to you? Please advise. Thanks.

LcChang
LcchangOk, I see.

Even without " 's ", does the original sentence " I can't find the Simpson will anywhere." still sound good to you? Please advise. Thanks.

LcChang
I'm sorry I cannot give you a definite answer. But I think "the Simpson will" (without 's) is correct at least grammatically. Here "Simpson" is used as a kind of adjective like "the Lincoln Memorial".

paco
Hi,

There is a subtle difference here.

the Simpson will The adjectival approach suggests the speaker is focused on the will, and is not thinking of Mr. and Mrs. Simpson as people. He doesn't seem to care about them. It's the kind of thing a lawyer would say, who handles a lot of wills.

the Simpsons' will The noun approach acknowledges the Simpsons as people. The speaker may care about them as people.

Best wishes, Clive
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