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Hi

I need a word for a person who sleeps very little? Is there any? And what about a person who sleeps a lot?

Thanks,

Tom
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Comments  
Hi,

Have a look at the words insomnia, narcolepsy, and possibly coma.

He is an insomniac.

He is a narcoleptic.

He is comatose.

Clive
Thanks, Clive.

I just looked them up.

Can I use these words in everyday conversation? I mean, aren't they medical terms? For example, my friend has no medical problem but he enjoys sleeping...long hours in the afternoon...sleeping late in the morning etc. Can I use narcoleptic? (if that's the adjective) for him? And so with the other words.

Tom
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Hi,

It's not unusual to speak of 'insomnia', but we would normally say things like 'He has trouble sleeping'. Or for the opposite, 'he sleeps a lot'.

I find that people on the Forum often ask 'What is one word meaning . . . 'I tend to treat this kind of query as a puzzle to be solved, but I often wonder why people need just one word. Emotion: smile

Best wishes, Clive
No, someone who enjoys sleeping and likes to take naps would not be described as narcoleptic. Someone who falls asleep while driving and can't watch tv for five minues without falling asleep is narcoleptic.

Also, "insomniac" describes someone who has trouble falling asleep and/or stayng asleep, and doesn't get the amout of sleep they need. There are also people who simply don't need very much sleep, and I had the feeling that this was what you were asking about originally.

There really are no special words for people who need a lot of sleep or very little sleep. Just say something like,

"My friend loves to sleep. He'll sleep 12 hours a day if he gets the chance"

or

"He's one of those people who only needs five hours of sleep a night. That's how he gets so much work done!"

(Clive is right -- people often ask for a single word describing a complicated situation. I'm always tempted to reply "There's no single word for that. That's why we have sentences!")
khoff(Clive is right -- people often ask for a single word describing a complicated situation. I'm always tempted to reply "There's no single word for that. That's why we have sentences!")

Thanks, Clive and Khoff.

In fact what happens is that many words exist in my language and of course other people's languages which may or may not have exact translations in English. In my language there are proper words for people who sleep a lot or who hardly sleep. So, by basic instint, we (or at least I) think this way:

He is a _____________________. [and here in the dash we want a word for a person who sleeps little]

Hope I am able to get my point across.

Tom

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Consider Wakeful,but it's a bit archaic,I think.
Sleepy or Somnolent  maybe good for that kind of person.
That makes sense -- people asking for a specific word because such a word exists in their native language. Thanks for the explanation, Mr. Tom.
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