We have been knowing each other since high school.

Is this sentence gramatically wrong?
If so, anyone please kindly explain why?
A Korean learner
1 2 3 4
We have been knowing each other since high school. Is this sentence gramatically wrong? If so, anyone please kindly explain why?

The sentence is grammatically correct but
unidiomatic in British/American contexts.
Those speakers would usually say:
"We have known each other since high school."
But in South Asia the original sentence may
be common. There is a regional preference
there for the past continuous tense of the
verb (been knowing for known.)

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Don Phillipson had it:
We have been knowing each other since high school. Is this sentence gramatically wrong? If so, anyone please kindly explain why?

The sentence is grammatically correct but unidiomatic in British/American contexts. Those speakers would usually say: "We have known each other ... be common. There is a regional preference there for the past continuous tense of the verb (been knowing for known.)

It seems to me (with no authority) that you can only use the continuos form for verbs which describe an activity with a start and end, which happens multiple times:
I've been kicking him since high school.
She's been eating jam for many years.
We've been visiting her since she got ill.
They have been wearing jeans since 1960.
But not for verbs which describe an unchanging state. All these are wrong:
I've been having red hair for the last 20 years.
She's been knowing me since we were children.

David
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We have been knowing each other since high school. Is this sentence gramatically wrong? If so, anyone please kindly explain why? A Korean learner

The COED gives one (archaic) definition of "to know" as "having sexual intercourse with". Whilst "We have known each other..." implies mere familiarity, does "We have been knowing each other since high school" perhaps suggest that they have been (what is colloquially known as) "having it off" during that time?

DB.
Naawoo schrieb:
We have been knowing each other since high school. Is this sentence gramatically wrong? If so, anyone please kindly explain why?

The present perfect progressive is usually used if you want to place stress on teh action.
The present perfect simple is used when you want to stress the aspects of state or result.
"to know" seems to me to be a state, so I'd use the latter tense.

Cheers
Michael

It's silly talking about how many years we will have to spend in the jungles of Vietnam when we could pave the whole country and put parking stripes on it and still be home by Christmas. Ronald Reagan, October 10, 1965
We have been knowing each other since high school. Is this sentence gramatically wrong? If so, anyone please kindly explain why? A Korean learner

Hi AKL
In this context 'know' is a "stative verb"; you either 'know' somebody or you don't, it's not possible to switch the state on or off. In the same way you can't say:-
* "We have been liking each other since we met'
but you can say:-
"We have been phoning each other since high school".

Your sentence needs to read:-
"We have known each other since high school".
Cheers
DC, EFL Teacher.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
We have been knowing each other since high school. Is this sentence gramatically wrong? If so, anyone please kindly explain why? A Korean learner

It's not exactly ungrammatical, but it's not the way a native speaker of English would say it.
Using the -ing form after a perfect tense ("have been" or "had been") seems, on a quick rummage through my brain, to be reserved for verbs that describe an actual action: doing, running, working.

The sentence you give I would re-write "We have known each other since high school."
Cece
We have been knowing each other since high school. Is this sentence gramatically wrong? If so, anyone please kindly explain why? A Korean learner

Be sure to read Omrud's post on this matter to understand how DB gets to his starting point.
The COED gives one (archaic) definition of "to know" as "having sexual intercourse with". Whilst "We have known each other..." ... since high school" perhaps suggest that they have been (what is colloquially known as) "having it off" during that time?

I don't think colloquialisms, one that I don't even know, will help someone from Korea, unless you are trying to teach the colloquialism.. You'd already been perfectly clear with "having sexual intercourse."

But other than that, yes, a very good post. I'm sure Don's right about the continuous (-ing) form being common in Asia, but in this case, Naawoo should be aware that if he uses the expression in front of a bunch of Westerners (or Australians or Philipinos maybe), it may come across as a double entendre, a way of saying they've having sex with each other since high school, while pretending to be speaking an Asian dialect of English. In some circumstances, like "We've been knowing each other for the last 5 years", or "since our vacation in Bali" this will be even more likely.
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