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Hello, there!^^

I want you to tell me abot the difference between
"Was my face red!"
and
"My face was red"

the former is usded in daily conversation?
and if that used, what would you think?

Thank you in advance.
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Used without a question mark, "Was my face red!" would almost certainly have an exclamation point. It's a stand-alone exclamation expressing extreme embarrassment, usually over some stupid error of great magnitude. Of course it may be used casually, but I've seen it written in formal letters of apology. It's probably the best idiom for expressing this particular emotion.

The declarative expression is used to to describe lesser embarrassment, or possibly a case of sunburn.
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In American English, you will often see emphatic statements (exclamations) that begin with "was" (or any form of "be"), often in combination with the word "ever". This is used in reaction to something extreme -- good or bad. For example:

After an extremely difficult exam:
- Oh, man! Was that ever hard!

When someone is unbelievably unpleasant to you:
- My, God! Is he ever obnoxious!

When you are eating something absolutely scrumptious:
- Wow! Is this ever good!

This also works with the verb "do":

If you have severe back pain:
- Does my back ever hurt!

If your friend looked breathtaking in her evening gown:
- You should have seen Mary! Did she ever look gorgeous!
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Comments  
AnonymousHello, there!^^ I want you to tell me abot the difference between "Was my face red!" and "My face was red" the former is usded in daily conversation? and if that used, what would you think? Thank you in advance.

In your examples it's not an inversion but a question, indeed. We use the inversion to emphasize something, to form questions and in some others way. It's too wide question to rattle on in general. Will you provide us with specific sentences?
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