Hello!
the only time i've been to a foreign country to learn english, it was in Ireland. More precisely in Dublin; so I wanted to know if there are lof of idioms, or pronounciation diffrent from the british english!
I've juste noticed some people pronounce "R" as an "L". Like "turln alound" for example.
Could anyone tell me more about differences that could eventually make an Irish difficult to understand for another english speaker? Thanks for your help.
David4engCould anyone tell me more about differences that could -- eventually -- possibly make an Irish accent difficult to understand for another English speaker?
It's not likely that there is anything in the Irish accent that would be difficult for other English speakers to understand - certainly not for Americans.

[Off-topic: Note that eventuellement is not eventually. I believe that is the equivalence you were mistakenly trying to make above.]

CJ
Thanks for your answer and for your correction! My translation of "éventuellement" was wrong indeed. Is there a problem with the word "accent"? Maybe I should have replaced it by "tone"?

I suppose it's the same as in French language from Canada, France, Belgium, Switzerland, or some african countries. Some words could have different meanings, or some idioms sometimes, are not used in another other french speaking country. I also think there are few differences between Spanish from Spain, and from South Amercica.

For instance ninety is translated by "quatre-vingt-dix" in France, while it's "nonante" in Belgium and Switzerland (but only in these two countries).
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David4engIs there a problem with the word "accent"?
No. It's just that you left it out! Reread your post. The word "accent" is missing.

David4engFor instance ninety is translated by "quatre-vingt-dix" in France, while it's "nonante" in Belgium and Switzerland (but only in these two countries).
Yes. I know. I once asked a French woman if she didn't think that nonante (90 to us English speakers) was a lot simpler than quatre-vingt-dix(4-20-10 to us). She claimed no. She thought 4-20-10 was quite simple. It all depends on what you get used to. Emotion: smile

CJ
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CalifJim The word "accent" is missing.
Actually I wanted to say "an irish person" but all the same ^^

I think your right about nonante, it seems more logical and easier, as septante (70) instead of soixante-dix. And even octante (80) instead of quatre-vingts (but octante is only used in Switzerland)
David4engActually I wanted to say "an irish person" but all the same ^^
OK. I understand. Emotion: smile

For people from Ireland:

an Irishman - singular I think we avoid this term nowadays.

the Irish - plural

(I've never heard "an Irish" to refer to a person.)

CJ
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Again mistaken, I'm ashamed! I still have so much to learn about this beautiful language. Definetely a good reason to go abroad for a longer period to practise more...if I only had money to travel ^^

Anyway, thanks for your help Emotion: smile
David4enga good reason to go abroad for a longer period to practise more
Yes! Good idea!

David4engif I only had money to travel
I know the feeling. I feel the same way. Emotion: sad

David4engAnyway, thanks for your help
You're welcome.

CJ
I think those people you spoke to may have been Chinese....were you around parnell st. at the time you heard Turlin alound?
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