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Hello,

When a fruit matures, we can say it is ripe

Is there any corresponding word to describe an animal, such as pig or cattle, that reaches such a stage. Can we say an animal matures and can be sold

In Chinese, we call it "育成"
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You may say that an animal has reached maturity, but this usually means the animal is capable of reproduction.

I've heard the expression "ready for market," but I think it depends on the purpose for which the animal is being sold.
Even when being sold for food, the desirable condition/age of the animal varies according to the planned use.
An animal could turn "ripe" after it's dead for a while.

[Sorry for the bad joke; I just couldn't resist. We do use "ripe" to describe something that smells particularly bad.]
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Thanks, Philip, That was ripe. I had a hard enough time replying to the OP. I love animals, and when they've passed on I can only face them between two hamburger buns. [bah]
Let's not forget that we also can say that a person lived "to a ripe old age".
I agree with Avangi - besides "market-ready," I don't think we have such a word. And that really refers to the salability of the animal rather than its edibility.

I'm not sure how well a young, immature animal parallels the idea of an unripe fruit. Unripe fruit is really quite different from the ripe article. Even if it's edible, the taste is quite different, and it's often prepared differently (fried green tomatoes, green papaya salad, etc.) The young animals that we eat - veal, lamb, suckling pig - have meat more delicate in flavor and texture than the older animals, but "unripe" doesn't describe that very well. Perhaps this is where "immature" is the right choice.
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Okay, let me know when they're immature enough to sell!Emotion: big smile
AvangiThanks, Philip, That was ripe. I had a hard enough time replying to the OP. I love animals, and when they've passed on I can only face them between two hamburger buns.


Excuse me, sir ?

Did you mean "place them between two hamburger buns" ? I'm not sure I completely understand your use of "face" in the context, in case you really meant it...
thank you all

but I feel I still have no idea how to describe that kind of thing
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