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In my english learning,I found "stomach" is more oftenly used in english than in chinese(胃)to depict a feeling (or reaction).

(note :all the sentences are quoted from the books by J.K.Rowling)

( Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire)

(1)..the voice of Lord Voldemort. Harry felt as though an ice cube had slipped down into his stomach at the very thought...

(2)“Yeah, I know,” said Harry, but there was a leaden feeling in his stomach as he looked out of the window at the Hedwig-free sky.

(3)Trying to ignore the sinking feeling of disappointment in his stomach

(4) Harry watched her fly out of sight with the familiar feeling of unease back in his stomach.

(5) burning feeling of shame in his stomach every time he thought about it.

(6) As he said it, his stomach flooded with a wave of molten panic.

(7) Harry turned to look at her and his stomach gave a weird lurch as though he had missed a step going downstairs.

(8), but also with the lurking worry of the egg heavy in his stomach, as though he were carrying that around with him too.

(9) But he suddenly realized what he was saying, and he felt the excitement drain out of him as though someone had just pulled a plug in his stomach.

(10) Ron and Hermione stared at Harry, who felt his stomach drop.

(11) Harry's stomach leapt—he was now tying for first place with Cedric.

(12) Harry's stomach slipped several notches.

(13) Harry felt a chill in his stomach as Professor McGonagall struggled to find words to describe what had happened. He did not need her to finish her sentence.

(14) Harry felt a hot, sick swoop of anger in his stomach. He forced himself to look back at Dumbledore.

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( Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban)

(1)Harry's stomach gave a funny jolt.

(2)A feeling of great gloom in his stomach, Harry pulled the door open.

(3)She jerked her head at Harry, who felt his stomach clench.

(4) His stomach churned as he fell back to wondering what was going to happen

to him, and whether the Dursleys had managed to get Aunt Marge off the ceiling yet.

(5)Harry looked up at the owner of the hand on his shoulder and felt a bucketful of ice cascade into his stomach—he had walked right into Cornelius Fudge, the Minister of Magic himself.

(6) Harry's eyes darted downward, and what he saw made his stomach contract.

(7)Harry's stomach lurched.

(8)“Right,” he said, trying to recall as exactly as possible the wonderful, soaring sensation of his stomach.

(9) Harry's stomach turned over—Dumbledore would know exactly what had happened, if Malfoy said anything —

(10)“Yeah...” said Harry, his stomach writhing.

(11)Harry felt as though the bottom had dropped out of his stomach.

(12)Some sort of explosion took place in the pit of Harry's stomach.

(13)A feeling of great gloom in his stomach

Could you please tell me what feeling it implies with different verbs?
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Hly2004Could you please tell me what feeling it implies with different verbs?

Oh yes.

All of these instances where some feeling was felt in the stomach mean that such a feeling was intensely emotional. When you (in English) feel something in your stomach, you are having an emotional reaction to some situation. Almost always these indicate feelings of fear or anxiety.

Whether the stomach lurched, dropped, writhed, jolted, clenched, or whatever, they generally are different ways of saying the same thing: Harry (or whoever) was apparently feeling distressed about something.

One might also feel these things in 'the pit of the stomach', or in 'the gut'. Or they might have a 'gut feeling' as in, "I have a gut feeling that we're not alone in this forum!"

C.
Both "gut ..." and "stomach ... " here are similar to "deep down inside", I think.
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Hly2004In my english learning,I found "stomach" is more oftenly used in english than in chinese(胃)to depict a feeling (or reaction).

An intriguing observation. Are speakers of English particularly gastrocentric, I wonder? Or is it a mannerism of this particular author?

Homer often describes the effects of feelings on the heart and knees. D.H. Lawrence talks of "bowels" and "loins". Dry mouths and tight throats are also often used to suggest emotion. Perspiration too, I suppose.

MrP
PieanneBoth "gut ..." and "stomach ... " here are similar to "deep down inside", I think.

Absolutely. What's more, the 'deep down inside' brings home what might actually be going on, as well.

When one has one of these 'gut feelings', there is almost always a bona fide visceral reaction. The pulse rate rises, the blood pressure rises, the breathing becomes shallow, chemicals are released in the brain, the whole nine yards. But since few of the organs involved have sensory nerves, the feeling must be translated to other external systems...like the stomach muscles.

By the way, this is also why heart attacks manifest externally as radiating pain in the arm and neck.

Sorry -- got excited.

C
I guess it depends on which part of one's body is the most fragile/sensitive?

A book here in France sells very well; it's "tout vient du ventre" (everything comes from the belly), or something like that. I haven't read it, though. I'm waiting for one that would read "everything comes from the brain". Emotion: smile
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Crux_onlineWhen one has one of these 'gut feelings', there is almost always a bona fide visceral reaction.

And extremes of "gut feeling" lead to loss of bowel and bladder control.

MrP