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Mister MicawberYou are too bound up in theory and are ignoring the reality of language use.  I can only repeat:  It is a matter of how you view the 'continuing action'.
Continuing action is viewed throughout the world equally and banally - as imperfect aspect.

The "phenomenon" of English language is that its "common usage" maintains the state of war with its "theory". It does not happen in other languages (at least, not to that extent). If you follow the "English common usage", you'll end up nowhere.
rinocerontePerfect Continuous tense here
I am so interested in your nomenclature of tenses. Could you label the verbs in the following sentences according to tense? I was trained using the traditional and common 12-tense paradigm of the verb. I don't know how things are labeled in your system, so please share it with us.

1. I do my homework everyday.
2. I did my homework yesterday.

3. I will do my homework tomorrow.

4. I am doing my homework now.
5. I was doing my homework when my mom called.
6. I might be doing my homework [when] / [at the time] you call me tomorrow.
7. I have already done my homework.
8. I had done my homework by the time my dad arrived.
9. I will have done my homework by the time the party starts.

10. I have been doing my homework for an hour (now).
11. I had been doing my homework for two hours when my classmate called to say there were no classes the following day.
12. I will have been doing my homework for hours before you come to help me. So you might as well not come.

You don't need to label them all. You may remove some which you don't classify as verb tenses in your system. You may label it ungrammatical. You may also add those in your system that are not in this 12-tense paradigm. I have encountered a lesson similar to yours before where I was introduced to this tense-aspect model of verbs. If I remember it right, the teacher didn't consider the future tense as a 'unique' 'real' tense. She considered the future tense to be a species of the 'present tense'.

And if you don't mind, please explain this "aspect of the verb" thing vis-a-vis "tense of the verb" as tersely and non-jargonic as possible.
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lagataw
rinocerontePerfect Continuous tense here
I am so interested in your nomenclature of tenses. Could you label the verbs in the following sentences according to tense? I was trained using the traditional and common 12-tense paradigm of the verb. I don't know how things are labeled in your system, so please share it with us.1. I do my homework everyday.2. I did my homework yesterday.3. I will do my homework tomorrow.4. I am doing my homework now.5. I was doing my homework when my mom called.6. I might be doing my homework [when] / [at the time] you call me tomorrow.7. I have already done my homework.8. I had done my homework by the time my dad arrived.9. I will have done my homework by the time the party starts.10. I have been doing my homework for an hour (now).11. I had been doing my homework for two hours when my classmate called to say there were no classes the following day.12. I will have been doing my homework for hours before you come to help me. So you might as well not come.You don't need to label them all. You may remove some which you don't classify as verb tenses in your system. You may label it ungrammatical. You may also add those in your system that are not in this 12-tense paradigm. I have encountered a lesson similar to yours before where I was introduced to this tense-aspect model of verbs. If I remember it right, the teacher didn't consider the future tense as a 'unique' 'real' tense. She considered the future tense to be a species of the 'present tense'.And if you don't mind, please explain this "aspect of the verb" thing vis-a-vis "tense of the verb" as tersely and non-jargonic as possible.
No problem:

1. Present Simple or Present Indefinite (imperfect aspect)

2. Past Simple or Past Indefinite (both perfect and imperfect aspects)
3. Future Simple or Future Indefinite (both perfect and imperfect aspects)
4. Present Progressive or Present Continuous (imperfect aspect)
5. Past Progressive or Past Continuous (imperfect aspect)
6. Future Progressive or Future Continuous (imperfect aspect, although I don't know why you decided to use "might" here. "I will be doing my homework" would be more logical)
7. Present Perfect (perfect aspect)
8. Past Perfect (perfect aspect)
9. Future Perfect (perfect aspect)
10. Present Perfect Progressive/Continuous (imperfect aspect). The word "now" is not needed here.
11. Past Perfect Progressive/Continuous (imperfect aspect)
12. Future Perfect Progressive/Continuous (imperfect aspect)

All of them are fully grammatical and all have their strict reasons to exist.

The explanation of aspect vs. tense thing will follow a bit later. Now I need to go to the lessons. Regards.
lagatawI am so interested in your nomenclature of tenses.
For now I suggest you to do one thing: give me a definition of a tense. Give me a mathematical formula. For that you would need to recall those 12 tenses presented in form of a table. Thanks.
I don't want to consult any dictinary about this cuz you're asking about how I honestly understand the word 'tense'. A mathematical formula eh?! Will this do?

tense=time
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lagatawI don't want to consult any dictinary about this cuz you're asking about how I honestly understand the word 'tense'. A mathematical formula eh?! Will this do?tense=time
Nope Emotion: smile. That's the key thing in understanding the whole system. See you in couple of hours.

(a Table!...)
rinoceronteThe "phenomenon" of English language is that its "common usage" maintains the state of war with its "theory".
Hi Rino;

I have a couple of questions, if you please.
First, what is your authoritive source of this English language theory?

Second, in your profile, you say you are an English teacher. Do you demand that your English language students conform to the theory?

Regards,
A-Emotion: stars
AlpheccaStars
rinoceronteThe "phenomenon" of English language is that its "common usage" maintains the state of war with its "theory".
Hi Rino;I have a couple of questions, if you please.First, what is your authoritive source of this English language theory? Second, in your profile, you say you are an English teacher. Do you demand that your English language students conform to the theory?Regards,A-s
Hi Alfecca,

The authoritative source of what you call a "theory" is not likely to exist. What can be used as one is a knowledge of Language in general with no national attributes, in combination with as many languages as you can learn. Comparative linguistics.

I don't demand anything from my students. I give them as much knowledge as I can and always recommend to think the information over, draw conclusions of their own. I give them two English grammars - theoretical and practical ones. With the throrough explanation of what the difference between them is, how happened that they became so contradicting and why, how the correct bridge between Engslih and their language should be built. So, they know the subject quite deep.
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lagatawI have encountered a lesson similar to yours before where I was introduced to this tense-aspect model of verbs. If I remember it right, the teacher didn't consider the future tense as a 'unique' 'real' tense. She considered the future tense to be a species of the 'present tense'.And if you don't mind, please explain this "aspect of the verb" thing vis-a-vis "tense of the verb" as tersely and non-jargonic as possible.
I will try to make it as brief as possible, since the whole story takes hours.

1. The most fundamental. The majority of world´s languages have the category of aspect among the most vital ones. As vital as in some languages the aspect is mentioned in the very definition of a verb.
2. English scholars for some reason skipped the category of aspect when forming the English language centuries ago. The scholars of most other languages didn't.

3. But the category of aspect does not need an official confirmation of English scholars, it has been present in English language as long as the verbs have been present in the same language. Unseen and unnamed though. Like a ghost.

4. Where to look for the aspect and what does its presence mean?
Have a look at the Table of English Tenses. Rows vs. columns, as would any table imply. A cell as a product of correlation between table's rows and columns, again, as in any other table. A cell in the Table of English Tenses is called "tense". Hence, we already can start drawing a formula:
tense = row x column.
What category is represented by the rows? It's simple - present, past and future are times. Mere physical times. But what category is represented by the columns!!?!?! Mysteriously, none of the Englismen, let alone the local scholars, can answer this question. That's the main mystery of the English language and one of the main underwater rocks, which most of the students, both native and foreign, crash over. Indeed, how can it be that everyone knows that Table, but no one knows what category its key element - the column - represents! Everyone knows such adjectives as Simple, Indefinite, Progressive, Continuous, Perfect, Perfect Progressive, but no one can answer what nouns those adjectives apply to. What is Simple? What is Indefinite? What is not defined? What is Progressive? What is Perfect?
You may have already guessed. This category represents the Aspect. It's not an axiom, it's quite a theorem, I can prove it, but not now.
Hence, we can complete our formula:
tense = time x aspect

Now you can start analysing your tenses, that you have always been knowing (stative verbs rules is intentionally ignored in this sentence) from the Aspect angle. In other words, you can start looking for two principal aspects - perfect and imperfect. The first expresses a completed action with a result, the latter - mostly resultless process (sometimes a repeated action over a period of time). The perfect aspect is seen clearly - the perfect tenses. The imperfect aspect includes all six Progressive tenses. What's the real difference between Progressive and Perfect Progressive, that's another story. Past Simple and Future Simple tenses, or, better, Indefinite tenses include both aspects, and are called Indefinite exactly because the aspect is not defined here. Present Simple has only one aspect - imperfect. Actually, the vague terms "Progressive" and "Continuous" in fact are what is known throughout the world as "Imperfect".

That's a very brief introduction into "Tenses through the Prism of Aspect" topic. Enough information to start analysing and drawing conclusions.

Please note, that you may use this information in your work, both written or lessons, but with proper reference to Artem Ivantsov (Ukraine) only. All rights reserved.
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