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I just can't understand this king of construction?

When do we use this?

Please help me to understand.

Thank you very much!
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Because the elevator was broken, the employees had to walk/use the stairs.
The elevator being broken, the employees had to walk/use the stairs.

These mean roughly the same - "due to the fact that the elevator was broken, the employees...".
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I mean kind of construction. Emotion: big smile
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Could you please give an example?
The elevator being broken, the employees had to walk.

An example from my module.

Thanks!
 MichalS's reply was promoted to an answer.
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If "absolute construction" refers to the use of "being," and possibly "having," then it seems you could use it in place of most subordinate clauses introduced by "since" or "because."

"I stayed home from school today because I have the flu."
"Having the flu, I stayed home from school today."

"Since we can't afford to buy food in the market, we're growing our own."
"(Being) unable to buy food, we're growing our own."

Perhaps the idea is simply to substitute a non-finite verb in the subordinate clause.

(I guess I'll have to go look it up.) Emotion: thinking
alda1119When do we use this?
Probably more than 95% of these constructions are found in fictional literature. It is much more literary than it is conversational. So the answer is, "We use this when we are writing a novel". You may also need to use this in an English class, merely to show that you understand it. Emotion: smile

Read more here. Scroll down to "The Absolute Phrase".

http://www.englishrules.com/writing/grammar.php

You'll see there that you need at minimum a noun and a participle to create this kind of construction. A few examples are also provided.

CJ
AvangiIf "absolute construction" refers to the use of "being," and possibly "having,"
No. See my response.
Avangi"I stayed home from school today because I have the flu."
This might become something like this:

I stayed home from school today, the flu having laid me low.
Avangi"Since we can't afford to buy food in the market, we're growing our own."
This might become something like this:

Food being so expensive these days at the market, we've decided to grow our own vegetables at home.

CJ
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Thanks, Jim. I think I've got it.
He stood there, hair parted.

Why do they call it "absolute"?

What would you call it if you used a simple adjective instead of a participle?

He stood there, gun ready. vs. He stood there, gun drawn.

- A. Emotion: smile
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