Hello. I'm a new poster on this grop. Emotion: smile
I've got a question - can anyone tell me, what's the proper spelling of "a capella" in English? Would be good in AmEng and BrEng, if it differs. Why I'm asking? I've seen many spellings - "a capella", "acapella", "acappella", etc. etc. - and I have no idea which is the correct one. Is there any rule, or is it - while being "imported" from Italian - still in the process of "Englishization" and there is no proper spelling strictly defined? TIA for any kind of help.

regards,
CoosteR
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I've got a question - can anyone tell me, what's the proper spelling of"a capella" in English? Would be good in AmEng and BrEng, if it differs. Why I'm asking? I've seen many spellings - "a capella", "acapella","acappella",

A capella
is the only correct form i.e. two words.
etc. etc. - and I have no idea which is the correct one. Is there anyrule, or is it - while being "imported" from Italian - still in the process of "Englishization" and there is no proper spelling strictly defined?

No. This Italian term has been established in English for centuries. Most of the technical terms in music come from Italian (e.g. piano = soft, adagio = slow, fermata = hold the note etc.) In all cases I can think of, English spelling and pronunciation are just the same as in Italian. (This is particularly easy for Engliish speakers because of the way Italian is spelled and pronounced.) No special rule governs the Anglicization of new words from any particular other language.

Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
It's "a cappella" with a double "p" according to Collins; no one-p alternative given.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
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U¿ytkownik "Don Phillipson" (Email Removed) napisa³ w wiadomoœci
A capella is the only correct form i.e. two words.

If so, what's funny is that the "acapella" is the most common form that appears in the SoulSeek P2P application - one known for containing usually full albums/singles/lps etc. So the files are usually tagged the way the songs on the original CDs are described. So - are the recording companies making a permanent typo?
It's strange that an incorrect form has pushed the correct one from the top and is more popular...

regards,
CR
U¿ytkownik "Harvey Van Sickle" (Email Removed) napisa³ w wiadomoœci
It's "a cappella" with a double "p" according to Collins; no one-p alternative given.

LOL, we're at home. No rule, it seems, as Don mentioned "a capella" as the correct form. Any other suggestions? ; )

regards,
CoosteR
I've got a question - can anyone tell me, what's the proper spelling of "a capella" in English?

It might be good to ask in , though it seems from the newsgroup's name that they would say the correct one is "a cappella".
My personal favorite a cappella group (Rockapella) uses only one "p" in their name, but that may be artistic license on their part.

It's good to see another a cappella fan. (Assuming you are.) The genre doesn't get the attention it deserves.

Michael DeBusk, Co-Conspirator to Make the World a Better Place Did he update http://home.earthlink.net/~debu4335 / yet?
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U¿ytkownik "Michael DeBusk" napisa³ w wiadomoœci
My personal favorite a cappella group (Rockapella) uses only one "p" in their name, but that may be artistic license on their part.

Okay, but if we assume that the "capella" part is correct, we still have got the "a" part - should it be sticked to the "capella", or should it be separated?
It's good to see another a cappella fan. (Assuming you are.)

Yeah, I personally adore Rockapella and King's Singers. Emotion: smile
The genre doesn't get the attention it deserves.

Sad, but true...

regards,
CoosteR
Hello. I'm a new poster on this grop. Emotion: smile I've got a question - can anyone tell me, what's theproper spelling of "a capella" in English?

"a cappella" is Italian term taken as is into English. It is occassionally seen as "a capella", but no one said that all English-writers are decent spellers in either English or Italian. That Merriam-Webster reports it only reflects "usage," meaning that there are poor spellers and MW doesn't want to hurt their feelings.
Would be good in AmEng and BrEng, if it differs.

The only difference is that one US publisher of dictionaries (MW) regularly reports misspellings as "also" forms.
It's "a cappella" with a double "p" according to Collins; no one-p alternative given.

LOL, we're at home. No rule, it seems, as Don mentioned "a capella" as the correct form. Any other suggestions? ; )

Don is reporting a misspelling used by a small number of people as the "only correct form." Pay no attention to him.
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