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I have three questions for you, dear friends from EnglishForward, all related to the causative verb have. Could you help me with them, please?

1.- It is clear for me how to make sentences in Past and Present with the causative have. But I have troubles with the future.
For instance, which is the active sentence for the passive “I’m going to have my car repaired”?
2.- Is it the same to say: “I got my hair cut” or “I had my hair cut”
3.- Is it the same to say: “Have you ever had your passport stolen?” or “Has your passport been ever stolen?”
Thank you in advance,
Eladio
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1. I'm going to have someone repair my car
2. somebody cut my hair/the hairdresser cut my hair/I asked someone to cut my hair
3. has anybody ever stolen your passport
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Hi, pieanne! Thank you, but you did not answer to my two lasst questions:
2.- Is it the same to say “I got my hair cut” or “I had my hair cut”
3.- Is it the same to say “Have you ever had your passport stolen?” or “Has your passport been ever stolen?”
Eladio
Sorry!
2. to me it's the same
3.a) you're talking about "you"
3.b) you're talking about passports.
Hello Eladio:

I am an ESL teacher, and I'd like to answer your grammar questions.
Responses:
1) The active sentence for the passive I'm going to have my car repaired" would be "(Someone/A mechanic/etc. ) is going to repair my car" when the subject is one of the above.
2) The 2 sentences "I got my hair cut" and "I had my hair cut" are essentially the same in meaning (both actions performed in the past)
3) "Have you ever had your passport stolen?" is the same in meaning as "Has your passport ever been stolen" (by the way, the order ...been ever stolen...is corrected as : ...ever been stolen". The first sentence with the causative "had" is placing the emphasis on the fact that someone else stole the passport, but the time frame and meaning are otherwise the same.
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