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Hi

I have couple of doubts changing active - passive and vice versa,,, here are the sentences,

1.Passive to Active voice.

1.The sugar is blended with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained.

2.He was not expected to check his iphone every hour, but he was expected to call the office once a day.
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Anonymous1.The sugar is blended with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained.
2.He was not expected to check his iphone every hour, but he was expected to call the office once a day.
We blend the sugar with the butter until we obtain a smooth mixture.

"The office" didn't expect him to check his iphone every hour, but they did expect him to call in once a day.
(casual use of "the office," "they," and "call in.")

Please offer some attempt at answering the questions. Thanks!

Best regards, - A. Emotion: smile
AnonymousI have couple of doubts changing active - passive and vice versa,,, here are the sentences,
1.Passive to Active voice.
1.The sugar is blended with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained.
2.He was not expected to check his iphone every hour, but he was expected to call the office once a day.

You can't convert these 'short passives' to actives without knowing who the obligatory subject of the active version is. So, these active voice versions are clearly ungrammatical:

1. *Blends the sugar with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained..

2. *Expected him to check his iphone every hour, but expected to call the office...

BillJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I have couple of doubts changing active - passive and vice versa,,, here are the sentences,

1.Passive to Active voice.

1.The sugar is blended with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained.

2.He was not expected to check his iphone every hour, but he was expected to call the office once a day.

It's a wrong question. The 1. and 2. are in active voice. So, you have to put the subjects of the 1. & 2. ( 'sugar' and 'he') in the object positions to have sentences in the active voice in order to change them into the subjects of passive sentences:

They blend the sugar with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained. (active voice)

The sugar is blended with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained. (passive voice)

His boss didn't expect him to check his iphone every hour, he expected him to call the office once a day. (active voice)

He was not expected to check his iphone every hour, but he was expected to call the office once a day. (passive voice)
Part of the charm of the passive voice is that the actor doesn't need to be named.

Anyone who asks you to make a transformation to active voice should know this,
and expect you to make up (invent) the actor.

How is the question wrong?
AnonymousIt's a wrong question. The 1. and 2. are in active voice. So, you have to put the subjects of the 1. & 2. ( 'sugar' and 'he') in the object positions to have sentences in the active voice in order to change them into the subjects of passive sentences:
They blend the sugar with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained. (active voice)
The sugar is blended with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained. (passive voice)
His boss didn't expect him to check his iphone every hour, he expected him to call the office once a day. (active voice)
He was not expected to check his iphone every hour, but he was expected to call the office once a day. (passive voice)
You need to rethink the parts in bold, or at least explain in greater detail. You seem to contradict yourself later in your post.

CJ
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BillJ So, these active voice versions are clearly ungrammatical:
1. *Blends the sugar with the butter until a smooth mixture is obtained..
2. *Expected him to check his iphone every hour, but expected to call the office...
Clearly so.
But where did they come from?
Mix it well until smooth and well combined.