+0
Hello
I don't know they are adj clause or noun clause.
Thank you for your answer.

1. Desert plants differ in (the ways that )they adapt themselves to arid places.

2. Direct mail and direct email are (two ways that) companies are able to mass target potential customers.
1 2 3
Comments  
Hello Wang Chun

1. Desert plants differ in the ways [that they adapt themselves to arid places].
2. Direct mail and direct email are two ways [that companies are able to mass target potential customers].

I take both as adjective clauses that modify "ways".

Noun clauses are like this;
[That they adapt themselves to arid places] is a characteristic of desert plants.

paco
Hello paco2004
Thank you for your answer.
Can you give me a hand with this sentence.

(The statement that) all students should receive thr university education really strikes me as grossly exaggerated.

This is noun or adj clause.

Thank you
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
To WANG CHUN

You are making the same mistake again. "(The statement that)" is NOT a clause. A clause contains a verb and in traditional grammar is said to consist of a subject and predicate.

Your sentence, "(The statement that) all students should receive thr university education really strikes me as grossly exaggerated." can be grammatically analysed like this:-

i) The statement---subject
ii) that all students should receive their university education----adj. clause qualifying the noun "statement"
iii) strikes ------main verb of the sentence
iv) me -----object of the verb "strikes"
v) really...as grossly exaggerated ( adverbial phrase modifying the verb "strikes")
Would you please explain why the clauses in following sentences are 'noun clauses'?

I don't know [who he is]

I don't remember [where I put it?]

I wonder [when she left].

I am not sure [what time it is?]
Here is why, rishonly.

Those three verbs used in your examples (know, remember, wonder) are all transitive verbs requiring objects for which nouns are qualified. Therefore, the bracketed parts are noun clauses. With regard to the last example, 'be sure' is originally 'be sure of.' 'of' is a preposition. Prepositions too require objects. This 'of' is omitted when it is followed by interrogatives like what, where, how, why, who, which, when, and by whether clauses.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi,

I think these are all good explanations. Here is another, using simpler, less abstract terms.

If you can replace the clause by a noun (sometimes with minor syntax changes), it's a noun clause.

I don't know [who he is] I don't know his name.

I don't remember [where I put it?] I don't remember its location.

I wonder [when she left]. I wonder about the reason.

I am not sure [what time it is?] I am not sure of the time.

Best wishes, Clive

Thanks a lot, Komountain and Clive.
You're welcome.

You will never go wrong if you memorize by rote that wh-clauses (excluding whether clauses) and preposition-led clauses are all noun clauses.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more