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1. He went away sad.

2. He went away sadly.

3. He went away happy.

4. He went away happily.

In my opinion, I think sentences #2 and #4 are correct.

Could any native speaker tell me which of the above sentences are acceptable?

Thank you very much for your reply.
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Comments  
In the right context all are acceptable.
1. He was sad when he went away.
2. He went away [in a sad manner / looking sad].
3. He was happy when he went away.
4. He went away [in a happy manner / looking happy].

2. and 4. could be rephrased very slightly -- with a comma, or by preposing the adverb -- to yield a different meaning. Of the two, preposing the adverb is the more idiomatic and less ambiguous turn of phrase.

He went away, sadly.
Sadly, he went away.
It was [sad / unfortunate] that he went away.

He went away, happily.
Happily, he went away.
[It was fortunate / We were lucky] that he went away. Thank goodness he went away.

CJ

PS. My instinct tells me you want to say 1 and 3.
yea ur rite.
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1. She was dancing happy.

2. She was dancing happily.

3. She danced happy.

4. She danced happily.

Which of the above sentences are not acceptable?

Thanks a lot for your reply.
To me, 1 & 3 are not correct unless you put a comma before "happy"
http://www.eslcafe.com/forums/student/viewtopic.php?p=44820#44820

1. She danced happy.
2. She danced happily.
3. He went away happy.
4. He went away happily.
Sentence 1 is not so common, but it certainly could be used (in informal conversation) to mean "She was in a happy mood while dancing."
Sentence 2 also has the word order "She happily danced," and means "She was happy to dance (when she was asked to dance)."
Sentence 3 means "He was in a happy mood when he went away."
And Sentence 4 means "He wanted to go away, so he was happy that he was able to go away."
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Hello Teo

The problem you are raising is tough to discuss. The constructions <S V C> and <S V O C> where C is an adjective depicting the subject's state are called "subject-related depictive construct" or "subject-related secondary predicate". The last term indicates that the sentences comprises of two parts : <S V O> and <S is/was C>. The constructions are still under study to be established as grammatical constructions. One restriction is that <S is/was C> must be so strongly related to the event described by <S V O> that the listener can easily understand the relation. From the learners' view, it would be better to look upon them as a kind of idiomatic expression. That means, we learners should be careful not to generalize this sort of construction.

1) She danced happy.
2) She danced happily.
It is not difficult to guess #1's relation between "She danced" and "She was happy", i.e., "She was happy when she danced" or "She danced because she was happy". Nevertheless, the use of this sentence is rather rare. The sentence #2 says "She looked happy when she danced" (Nobody knows whether she was really happy or no

3) They went away happy.
4) They went away happily.
As for this pair, #3 is more commonly used than #4. The sentence #3 would mean "they were happy when they went away" as Dave Shaffer explained. I take the sentence #4 to mean "They look happy when they went away".

5) They went away, happily.
6) Happily, they went away.
"Happily" in these two sentences works as a sentential adverb (an adverb that modifies the whole predicate), and they mean "It was a happy thing (for them) that they went away", as CJ already mentioned.

paco
Sentence 2 also has the word order "She happily danced," and means "She was happy to dance (when she was asked to dance)."
This doesn't strike me as the default interpretation for "she danced happily". If the sentence is intended to be from her point of view, it means "she was happy while dancing"; if it's from someone else's point of view, it means "she appeared to be happy while dancing".
Sentence 3 means "He was in a happy mood when he went away."
This is slightly misleading. You say "go away happy" in this kind of context:


MrQ discovers a black beetle in a packet of salad. He goes back to the supermarket and complains. The supermarket give him $50 in compensation. MrQ goes away happy.
MrP
Teo
1. She was dancing happy.

2. She was dancing happily.

3. She danced happy.

4. She danced happily.

Which of the above sentences are not acceptable?

Thanks a lot for your reply.
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