+1
I typically add a comma or "and" when using adjacent adverbs. Is this proper English?

Example: The statute was clearly and definitively articulated.

-or-

The cat was completely, utterly content to lay about all day.

To me, it seems weird to say either of the above sentences without the and or comma.

Example: I conclude the restriction to carry signs into buildings does pass the four-prong O’Brien test and should be considered perfectly legally acceptable.

The sentence immediately above just seems wrong.

Any advice would be appreciated, and thank you!
+0
Hi,
I typically add a comma or "and" when using adjacent adverbs. Is this proper English? Yes.

But it depends on the adverbs. eg The statute was very clearly articulated

Example: The statute was clearly and definitively articulated. Sounds fine

-or-

The cat was completely, utterly content to lay about all day. Not wrong, but sounds a bit literary to me. I'd normally say 'and'.

To me, it seems weird to say either of the above sentences without the and or comma.

Example: I conclude the restriction to carry signs into buildings does pass the four-prong O’Brien test and should be considered perfectly legally acceptable.

The sentence immediately above just seems wrong. Yes. I'd say
. . . should be considered perfectly acceptable legally.

Any advice would be appreciated, and thank you!

Clive

Comments  
I had not considered simply splitting the two adverbs like you did: perfectly acceptable legally.

I will try to follow that example in the future as it is the strongest choice in the way it sounds nice. Or, I will simply use only one adverb.

Technically speaking, is there some grammar rule hat states how to handle adjacent adverbs. I unsuccessfully scoured the web before finding this site and putting it into your hands.

I also appreciate your example of "very clearly." You're very helpful, and now I have to go register. I'm glad I stumbled onto this website. Emotion: smile