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I've come across the term "adjective appositive" and "adverb appositive" a few times, and I'm just wondering if this is widely-used. Is it an incorrect description of a construction that should be called something else? I'm asking this because I always see appositives defined as nouns (or noun phrases/clauses).

Here are a couple examples:

"The fire, yellow and orange, warmed the room." - adjective appositive

This page cached by Google calls this an adverb appositive: "The man shouted loudly, (which was) even frantically, to calm the crowd".

It explains, "Most appositive units can be considered nonrestrictive clauses with the relative pronoun and the verb deleted." I can see how an appositive can be seen as an elliptical nonrestrictive clause, but is there no other term for this usage of adjectives and adverbs? Perhaps you could even explain it as an elliptical participial phrase: "The fire, (being) yellow and orange, warmed the room." That doesn't work for the adverb appositive, though.

So, what are your thoughts? What would you call this and how would you explain it?
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Inchoateknowledge
Welkins2139
" (which was) even frantically" is not an adverb clause. It is an adjective clause.

it is not a clause, let alone an adjectival clause

For example. The dog which was even frantically barked at me. Which clause as adjective is modified the dog.
Thanks for your replies! I can see this is an area of debate. Well, now I understand that appositives aren't necessarily nouns or noun phrases.

The adjective appositive seems to make sense, but I think the so-called "adverb appositive" is an incorrect term. After all, an appositive renames or gives more information about a noun; adverbs can't modify nouns. But then is there another term for something that renames or gives more information about a verb? Would it be something like a nonrestrictive or parenthetical adverbial?

The only grammatically correct example I can think of is the "even frantically" set off by commas. That sort of construction also occurs with adjectives, as in "His shouts were loud, even frantic." Couldn't the comma(s) be replaced with the word and?

"He shouted loudly and even frantically."

"His shouts were loud and even frantic."

Maybe this is a special example of a comma replacing an omitted word, just like in "The round, white table". What do you think?
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Welkins2139
Inchoateknowledge
Welkins2139
" (which was) even frantically" is not an adverb clause. It is an adjective clause.

it is not a clause, let alone an adjectival clause

For example. The dog which was even frantically barked at me. Which clause as adjective is modified the dog.

hi Welkins,

first of all I envy your persistence.

secondly, "The dog which was even frantically barked at me." is a false sentence.

frantically is an adverb, not an adjective

the adjective form is frantic

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The man shouted loudly, even frantically, to calm the crowd.

This is our original sentence, so I suggest we keep to it.

even frantically is not a clause, because it does not contain a verb.

It is an adverb phrase.

Now let me consider your sentence

The dog which was even frantical barked at me

without commas sounds clumsy

The dog, which was even frantical, barked at me.

which was even frantical is a subordinate clause and a noun clause, not an adjectival one.

The head is the relative pronoun: which.
Hi Inchoateknowledge,

frantically is an adverb, not an adjective. ( I agree)

Is it that modifies the adjective word "even"?

even frantically is not a clause, because it does not contain a verb.

It is an adverb phrase. (I agree but I've never said even frantically was a clause.)

The dog which was even frantical barked at me

without commas sounds clumsy

The dog, which was even frantical, barked at me I disagree. With the commas, it is a restritice clause. It is essential to tell you which dog is.

which was even frantical is a subordinate clause and a noun clause, not an adjectival one. I disagree. It is not a subordinate clause. Each subordinate clause begins with after, although, as, as if, as long as, as though, because, before, even though, if, in order that, provide that, once, since, so that, that, thoough, unless, until, where, where,and while.

Which clause indicate you what clause, I know it is adjective clause clause.

An adjective clause is introduced by a relative pronoun(who, whom, whose, which or that)

The head is the relative pronoun: which.
Hi Inchoateknowledge,

frantically is an adverb, not an adjective. ( I agree)

Is it that modifies the adjective word "even"?

even frantically is not a clause, because it does not contain a verb.

It is an adverb phrase. (I agree but I've never said even frantically was a clause.)

The dog which was even frantical barked at me

without commas sounds clumsy

The dog, which was even frantical, barked at me I disagree. With the commas, it is a restritice clause. It is essential to tell you which dog is.

which was even frantical is a subordinate clause and a noun clause, not an adjectival one. I disagree. It is not a subordinate clause. Each subordinate clause begins with after, although, as, as if, as long as, as though, because, before, even though, if, in order that, provide that, once, since, so that, that, thoough, unless, until, where, where,and while.

Which clause indicate you what clause, I know it is adjective clause clause.

An adjective clause is introduced by a relative pronoun(who, whom, whose, which or that)

The head is the relative pronoun: which.
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My dictionary doesn't have "frantical". I'd say

The dog, which was frantic, barked at me.
AlienvoordMy dictionary doesn't have "frantical". I'd say

The dog, which was frantic, barked at me.
Much more palatable, to me, at least.
Marius Hancu
AlienvoordMy dictionary doesn't have "frantical". I'd say

The dog, which was frantic, barked at me.
Much more palatable, to me, at least.
Would you tell us why it is more acceptable?

I strongly suggest you give your reasons. Without reason, I just cannot take it into my head. Without reason, some readers cannot figure out what is difference between two sentences. With reason, I like to know why would you like that than the one that I wrote.

Thanks
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Is it that modifies the adjective word "even"?
In the sentence, even is an adverb!

The dog which was even frantical barked at me -- this sentence is stilll wrong.
As I have said earlier, the adjective form is frantic.

The dog, which was even frantic(al), barked at me. I was not saying without the commas the sentence is false, but that it is clumsy.

"It is essential to tell you which dog is." Yes

which was even frantic(al) -- this is definitely a subordinate clause. It plays a subordinate role to the main clause. Welkins, this is basic grammar.

Let me give you an example from my grammar book, Compehensive grammar of the English Language:

the school which my student attend is within walking distance.

"the noun clause is complex, but we do not consider that the sentence is therefore a complex sentence, since the subordinate clause does not function as a constituent of the sentence."

Which my students attend is a noun clause in adjective position.

Quod erat faciendum
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