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I've come across the term "adjective appositive" and "adverb appositive" a few times, and I'm just wondering if this is widely-used. Is it an incorrect description of a construction that should be called something else? I'm asking this because I always see appositives defined as nouns (or noun phrases/clauses).

Here are a couple examples:

"The fire, yellow and orange, warmed the room." - adjective appositive

This page cached by Google calls this an adverb appositive: "The man shouted loudly, (which was) even frantically, to calm the crowd".

It explains, "Most appositive units can be considered nonrestrictive clauses with the relative pronoun and the verb deleted." I can see how an appositive can be seen as an elliptical nonrestrictive clause, but is there no other term for this usage of adjectives and adverbs? Perhaps you could even explain it as an elliptical participial phrase: "The fire, (being) yellow and orange, warmed the room." That doesn't work for the adverb appositive, though.

So, what are your thoughts? What would you call this and how would you explain it?
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Comments  (Page 3) 
which (USED TO REFER)
pronoun
used as the subject or object of a verb to show what thing or things you are referring to, or to add information about the thing just mentioned. It is usually used for things, not people:
These are principles which we all believe in.

(Cambridge online dic)

the (pro)noun is the head of the phrase (clause), therefore it is a noun clause.

Welkins, I think we follow different interpretations of the English grammar.
By the way, the relative clause is a subordinate clause in all interpretations.
InchoateknowledgeIs it that modifies the adjective word "even"?
In the sentence, even is an adverb!

The dog which was even frantical barked at me -- this sentence is stilll wrong.
As I have said earlier, the adjective form is frantic.

Below is the orginal sentence.

For example. The dog which was even frantically barked at me. Which clause as adjective is modified the dog

I agree with you that which clause is also a subordinate clause. But a subordinate clause is either introduced by relative pronouns such as which,that or subordinate conjunctions such as after, although, ......

A relative subordinate is an adjective clause that modifies a noun. In this case, it is modifed the dog.

I think I should change "frantically" into "frantic"
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Below is the orginal sentence.

For example. The dog which was even frantically barked at me. Which clause as adjective is modified the dog

I agree with you that which clause is also a subordinate clause. But a subordinate clause is either introduced by relative pronouns such as which,that or subordinate conjunctions such as after, although, ......

A relative subordinate is an adjective clause that modifies a noun. In this case, it is modifed the dog.

I think I should change "frantically" into "frantic"
below is the original sentence:

The man shouted loudly, (which was) even frantically, to calm the crowd".
The man shouted loudly, even frantically, to calm the crowd".
By using the brackets the writer was trying to make us aware that the clause is ellipted.
"which was" is not within the sentence.

"A relative subordinate is an adjective clause that modifies a noun. In this case, it is modifed the dog."
it should be: it modifies the dog, and a subordinate clause

Yes, it modifies the dog, but I can not go along with the clause being labelled as adjectival, since the head, which classifies it, is not an adjective as regards is lexical function.

As I said, there are a lof of arguments over the correct labelling of syntactical units.
Inchoateknowledgebelow is the original sentence:

Yes, it modifies the dog, but I can not go along with the clause being labelled as adjectival, since the head, which classifies it, is not an adjective as regards is lexical function.

As I said, there are a lof of arguments over the correct labelling of syntactical units.

http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/adjectiveclause.htm
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Inchoateknowledgebelow is the original sentence:

The man shouted loudly, (which was) even frantically, to calm the crowd".
The man shouted loudly, even frantically, to calm the crowd".
By using the brackets the writer was trying to make us aware that the clause is ellipted.
"which was" is not within the sentence.

The writer should not put (which was) in the setence. It is wrong when he says " which was even frantically". That tells me the relative pronoun refers back to the man.

If you takes away the bracket, the sentence is fine.
The man shouted loudly, which was even frantic, to calm the crowd.
"That tells me the relative pronoun refers back to the man."
No
which can not be a proform of a noun refers to person: "the man"; it should be that or who!

This sentence is wrong any way you slice it. Sorry, I was not paying attention it -- the fact remains there is no adjectival clause.
This is the originl sentence:
"The man shouted loudly, even frantically, to calm the crowd"
Welkins, let us turn it to another chapter.
Welkins2139
Inchoateknowledgebelow is the original sentence:

Yes, it modifies the dog, but I can not go along with the clause being labelled as adjectival, since the head, which classifies it, is not an adjective as regards is lexical function.

As I said, there are a lof of arguments over the correct labelling of syntactical units.

http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/adjectiveclause.htm
Let me give you an example from my grammar book, Compehensive grammar of the English Language:

the school which my student attend is within walking distance.

"the noun clause is complex, but we do not consider that the sentence is therefore a complex sentence, since the subordinate clause does not function as a constituent of the sentence."

Which my students attend is a noun clause in adjective position.

As I said, there are different interpretations.
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so you think it is better called a noun clause or a subordinate clause modifying a noun than a adjective clause?

since the head, which classifies it, is not an adjective as regards is lexical function.

Would you explain that bold text?

Thank you
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