I'm just curious because, so far, I haven't been able to find the adjective of 'trough' in any dictionaries I've come across. My interest relates to meteorology for example in how to describe a trough-like dip in isobars.

Thanks for any help. Regards,
Martin Watson
1 2 3 4
I'm just curious because, so far, I haven't been able to find the adjective of 'trough' in any dictionaries I've come across. My interest relates to meteorology for example in how to describe a trough-like dip[/nq]^^
in isobars.

Are those like Mars bars?
Michael Hamm
AM, Math, Wash. U. St. Louis
(Email Removed) Standard disclaimers: http://math.wustl.edu/~msh210/ ... legal.html
I'm just curious because, so far, I haven't been able to find theadjective of 'trough' in any dictionaries I've come across. My interest relates to meteorology for example in how to describe a trough-like dip in isobars.

Troughful, like a chocolate troughful.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I'm just curious because, so far, I haven't been able to find the adjective of 'trough' in any dictionaries I've come across. My interest relates to meteorology for example in how to describe a trough-like dip in isobars. Thanks for any help. Regards, Martin Watson

Troughily isobode with a northerly blustery, yess!

(Back to you, Mike.)

Ross Howard
I'm just curious because, so far, I haven't been able to find the adjective of 'trough' in any dictionaries I've come across. My interest relates to meteorology for example in how to describe a trough-like dip in isobars.

Well, if there's a dip in the isobars, it's a trough. If UK meteorologists ever needed an adjective, it
would be "troughy". As in "... that straight westerly's beginning to look a little troughy over Ireland."
Philip Eden
(wearing his meteorologist hat)
I'm just curious because, so far, I haven't been able ... dip in isobars. Thanks for any help. Regards, Martin Watson

Troughily isobode with a northerly blustery, yess! (Back to you, Mike.)

Oh my Goodwin sandstorms, yes! Deep depressy for the marinade over Iceland and the Tescode; Scilly, Scilly Fisherfriends where anglers fear to Sole; Yar bloated in the anticyclode; North and Sow's earserious in the Minches, tummy-heavie on the boozzie of the deep, what a Lundy morning!

Mike.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I'm just curious because, so far, I haven't been able ... example in how to describe a trough-like dip in isobars.

Well, if there's a dip in the isobars, it's a trough. If UK meteorologists ever needed an adjective, it would be "troughy". As in "... that straight westerly's beginning to look a little troughy over Ireland." Philip Eden (wearing his meteorologist hat)

Yes, "troughy" came to my mind, too, because it's quite normal to add an opportunistic "-y" to nouns, informally at least.
I found the following on Google, not that it proves anything:

In eastern Pennsylvania, these “troughy” periods will result in more cool and, sometimes, damp conditions. Occasionally, we’ll see the western heat rush east for a day or two between “troughy periods.” Thus, expect some wild 25 to 30-degree temperatures swings during the first half of June. For example, the high temperature on Tuesday (May 30) was just 69F, but highs on Friday (June 2) will surge into the low 90s! By Saturday and Sunday (June 3/4) high temperatures will drop back into the middle 70s, and possibly hold in the 60s on Monday (June 5). This scenario may then repeat itself as warm air tries to rush back in for the following weekend (June 10/11).

Peasemarch.
In article <@lon-
I'm just curious because, so far, I haven't been able to find the adjective of 'trough' in any dictionaries I've come across. My interest relates to meteorology for example in how to describe a trough-like dip in isobars. Thanks for any help. Regards, Martin Watson

Deep trough? Shallow trough?

dg (domain=ccwebster)
I'm just curious because, so far, I haven't been able ... example in how to describe a trough-like dip in isobars.

Well, if there's a dip in the isobars, it's a trough. If UK meteorologists ever needed an adjective, it would be "troughy". As in "... that straight westerly's beginning to look a little troughy over Ireland."

The Oxford English Dictionary has "troughy", but it also mentions the adjectives "trough-like" and "trough-shaped".

Webster's Third New International Dictionary doesn't mention "troughy", "trough-like", or "trough-shaped", but Random House Webster's Unabridged has "troughlike" and no "troughy".
To me "troughy" seems less dignified than "troughlike".
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Show more