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hi teachers,
in such a sentence "the man there is a soldier."
whether the word "there" is an adjective or adverb?

In my Oxford dictionary, it says such usage is an adverb. But from my point, "there" modifies "man", so it should be an adjective.

please enlight me.
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From another dictionary:

adjective
11.
(used for emphasis, esp. after a noun modified by a demonstrative adjective): Ask that man there.

I agree.
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mikejiang0819"there" is an adjective or adverb?
It depends on which dictionary you consult. There are reasons to consider it an adverb and reasons to consider it an adjective. It does modify a noun, and some sources find that that is enough to call it an adjective. On the other hand, it doesn't answer the question "What kind of (man)?" as a typical adjective would do. So you could also say that it's an adverb.

If you are taking a class in English and your teacher has recommended a certain dictionary, then use that dictionary for class purposes.

CJ
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mikejiang0819In my Oxford dictionary, it says such usage is an adverb. But from my point, "there" modifies "man", so it should be an adjective.
This is my thought:

I agree with your dictionary. " There " refers to a location. So it appears to me as an adverb because it did not describe the man.

The man is a soldier.
Where is the man ? [ There ], [at the door], [ marching in the field]. So these are adverbials.
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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