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You're truely right Avangi.

I mistakenly used the word.

Thanks for correction

Iman
Hi, imantaghavi,

I sometimes hear the word used that way, but I believe it's incorrect. Emotion: smile

(The coach replaced the injured player.)
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The coach replaced the injured player
Why it can't be correct?

Thanks.
Sorry. "The coach replaced the injured player" is correct.

Ironically, both "to substitute" and "to replace" have intransitive as well as transitive meanings.

"The coach replaced the injured player" could be taken to mean that the coach entered the game in the injured player's stead.

(The coach substituted for the injured player.)
Thanks.

I think the same situation with meanings could be possible for different languages and phrases. For instance in Russian a phrase "The coach replaced the injured player" could be taken in absolutely the same two ways, but nobody in a sane mind wouldn't doubt about actual meaning of the phrase Emotion: smile

PS.. I newbie in English, but I hope I haven't made too many mistakes. Emotion: smile
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Repeat. Was deleted.
HomoZapien I hope I haven't made too many mistakes.
Clear as a bell. Emotion: wink

(Well, make that: "I'm a newbie.")

Hmmm, maybe it can be used as an adjective. I just haven't heard it that way before. Let me know.

(I'm a newbie. I'm newbie in English.) You need a verb either way.

- A.
HomoZapienWhy it can't be correct?
This is a common one: don't forget to reverse the subject and verb in question order.

"Why isn't it correct?" "Why is it incorrect?" "Why can't it be correct?" "Why didn't you tell me?"
Avangi

Yes, I've used "newbie" as an adjective and yes I f***ed up with "to be" Emotion: smile

Is it used as an adjective? I don't know Emotion: smile Actually I haven't thought about it before now... Thanks for the task Emotion: wink

Probably it isn't correct grammatically, but for my non-native-speaker ears it sounds okay.

In this sentence (I'm newbie in English) I think it would be better to consider "newbie" as a noun of course - Who am I in English? A newbie. So the sentence should be: I'm a newbie in English.

But if we say "I'm newbie here" or simple "I'm newbie" it seems fine to me as an adjective...The same as "I'm new".

What do you think?

PS "don't forget to reverse the subject and verb in question order".. Oh my! What a shame Emotion: smile Thanks a lot!
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HomoZapienbut nobody in a sane mind wouldn't doubt about actual meaning of the phrase
I've been waking up very slowly today. Here's one which I know is not the same in all languages: the double negative.

"Doubt" can also be very nasty in sorting out if we mean "yes" or "no," but you're okay here in that respect.

(I have one example on which my most respected colleagues disagree with me -- or I with them.

Hey, truth be told, they're all most respected.)

However, "Nobody wouldn't be confused about the actual meaning" means to us that everybody would be confused.

Cheers.
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