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Thanks a million!

I guess I've understood. I just want to check it out.. So there are two ways to say it:

"Nobody would be confused about the actual meaning" or

"Anybody wouldn't be confused about the actual meaning"

Right?

And "be confused" is more common in this particular meaning. Is it?

'Full circle' -- back to the parts of speech Emotion: smile

"... wouldn't be confused about the actual meaning"

Is it a verb(passive) or an adjective?

be confused about something: seems active to me -- adjective. Right?

And if we say "...wouldn't be confused by this sentence"

be confused by somebody or something: now it is the passive and "confused" is a verb. Right?

Please HELP! Emotion: smile
HomoZapien"Nobody would be confused about the actual meaning" or
"Anybody wouldn't be confused about the actual meaning"
Right?
These are both technically correct, but a native speaker would never use the second one.
He might say, "A person would not be confused about the actual meaning.
HomoZapienAnd "be confused" is more common in this particular meaning. Is it?
They could both work, but "doubt" is open to interpretation.

We usually use "doubt" when discussing the truth of some fact or proposition.

I doubt that he's ever worked for the CIA.

I have no doubt that this is going to work.

It's doubtful that your solution is correct.

I doubt that this word is being used correctly.

You might also say, "Nobody would [be likely to] make a mistake about the actual meaning."

I'd accept "Nobody would be in doubt about the actual meaning."

"Nobody would misunderstand the actual meaning."

To my ear, "I doubt that!" is a definite thumbs down.

On the other hand, "I have my doubts about that" often expresses varying degrees of skepticism. You're unconvinced.

I switched from "doubt" to "confusion" because I thought it would narrow the debate -- the focus. Emotion: big smile

Your usage was basically correct.
HomoZapienbut nobody in a sane mind wouldn't doubt about actual meaning of the phrase
There were some minor issues which I contrived to avoid, some having to do with various expressions using "doubt." I guess I failed there.
HomoZapien "... wouldn't be confused about the actual meaning"
Is it a verb(passive) or an adjective?
be confused about something: seems active to me -- adjective. Right?
And if we say "...wouldn't be confused by this sentence"
be confused by somebody or something: now it is the passive and "confused" is a verb. Right?
Excellent analysis. You have it exactly right, in my opinion. Emotion: nodding
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HomoZapien"Nobody would be confused about the actual meaning" or
"Anybody wouldn't be confused about the actual meaning"
Right?
Pardon me for butting in, gentlemen. The idea suggested above isn't possible when any, anybody/anyone or anything is the subject of the clause. You cannot say: Anybody didn't come. You have to say: Nobody came.

It is possible for all of these three "any" words to act as the subject or part of the subject, but in those cases the clauses are affirmative:

Anybody can do it!

Anything may happen.

Any boy knows the answer to this question.

However, you have a choice when these words are not the subject:

He knows nothing about it. = He doesn't know anything about it.

I saw no one / no-one there. = I didn't see anyone there.

He likes no kind of music. = He doesn't like any kind of music.

CB
Thank you! Your explanation is simply great! I'm really pleased I came across this site yestarday Emotion: left hug Emotion: smile

I'm sorry I guess I have another one question about the parts of speech.. May I..? Emotion: wink

We usually use "doubt" when discussing the truth of some fact or proposition.

I perfectly understand the meaning of this sentence, but I can't understand how it's constructed (or how it works)..

discussing seems to be a verb, but it's obviously not, becouse there is no "to be" here. It's not "when we are discussing".. but the meaning is the same. Right?

I also have googled some sentences with the same structure, here they are:

We usually use it when camping over weekends...

We usually use it when doing work..

So what are all these -ing words? [A]

Cheers for all your help! Emotion: shake hands
Cool Breeze

you're quite welcome))

Thank you very much!

He likes no kind of music. = He doesn't like any kind of music.

And if I want to say that I don't like or prefer something special.. for instance -- any particular type of music. What have I to say then? -- I prefer no kind of music.

?
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HomoZapienWe usually use "doubt" when discussing the truth of some fact or proposition.
First of all, it's preferable to start a new thread for a new point of grammar. When discussing is what many non-native grammarins call a clause equivalent and since the conjunction (when) denotes time, when discussing is a temporal clause equivalent. The meaning is as you suggest: when we discuss. I would prefer the simple tense (discuss) instead of the continuous (are discussing). A temporal clause equivalent can replace both tenses, though:

I saw an old friend when crossing a street. (= I saw an old friend when I crossed / was crossing a street.)

I think many Anglo-Saxon grammarians use the term "reduced clause" instead of "clause equivalent". Discussing and crossing are present participles here, not gerunds or verbal nouns. In other words, they are verbs, or verb forms, whichever term you like best.

You other two examples are grammatically similar and could be reworded:

We usually use it when we camp...

There are also verbless clause equivalents, like this one:

When in southern California, visit the Universal Studios. (= When you are in southern California, visit...)

It would take me a couple of hours to give you a detailed exposition of clause equivalents, so I'll stop here. Besides, they often have little to do with logic, which makes learning them quite difficult.

CB
HomoZapienI prefer no kind of music.
This is fine grammatically. In most situations I like no kind of music would probably be better. Or: I don't like any kind of music.

CB
...Or: I don't like any kind of music

Are you sure? I think the phrase could be interpreted as somebody don't like music at all. Couldn't it?
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Cool Breeze

"...which makes learning them quite difficult"

Yes, it does Emotion: smile It's very hard to me to understand, but thank you for your general explanation. Thanks for some new terms you gave me. I haven't heard before many of them. Your introduction was just great! I'll try to find out more about it. Thanks a lot!
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