1) Two people were seriously injured in the accident.
2) The meeting was very badly organised.

I know that both seriously and badly are adverbs, but I don't understand why the two boldface words are verbs.
To me they are adjectives.

3) It`s a reasonably cheap restaurant and the food is extremely good
4) The examination was surprisingly easy

These examples I can understand that the boldface words are adjectives.

So can anybody else explain to me what are the differences between verbs and adjectives?

I know the rules that say "A verb is an action word" and "An adjective is a describing word", but it's not enough to me.

If somebody else knows where I can find the explanation about that, just tell me where.

Thanks!
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This is sort of a pons assinorum of passive voice.

In many cases, a dual interpretation is possible:
(1) passive voice - People were injured. (Something was done to the people. The people received an action.)
(2) active voice, verb "to be" + past participle as adjective complement - People were injured. (People are hated.)
(This tells us what kind of people they were. They were injured people.)

These are not open to dual interpretation, because the adjectives are not derived from verbs:
(3) You can't say, "I was cheaped by the restaurant."
(4) You can't say, "I was easied by the exam."
Mikael1) Two people were seriously injured in the accident.
2) The meeting was very badly organised.

These are verbs. What you've got there is passive voice, which consists of Auxiliary verb "To Be" + Main Verb in the PAST PARTICIPLE. Thus, there's no way to mistake them with adjectives. To better identify whether a word is an adverb or an adjective you gotta analyze the sentence. Take a look at the following examples:

John is a very organized man. (organized is an adjective here because it qualifies the noun man)

John has organized the party very well. (organized here is a verb, in the past participle, in this case we have present perfect)
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Hi,

There are two way to approach this kind of questions;

There is no boubt these are passive sentences. But some people considered "injured" a past particple used as adjective to mean "they are seriously hurt....(in the accident)" Accident -can be viewed as the agent.
1) Two people were seriously injured in the accident.

The same is true here/ If you went to a meeting and the contents and presentation were so messy, then you can say:
2) "The meeting was very badly organised". This can be viewed as " the meeting was a mess". If you take this apporach, like some do, "organized" then is a past particple used as an adjective.

One thing can not change. They are passive sentences.
GoodmanOne thing can not change. They are passive sentences.
Hi Goodman.

Don't you agree that replacing an adjective derived from a transitive verb with one which is not, makes a sentence clearly in active voice? (That is, since intransitive verbs can't be used passively?)

As a result of the collision, two of her fingers were completely severed. (passive, possibly active)

As a result of the collision, two of her fingers were completely gone. (only active)

Best wishes, - A.
I agree, Avangi. The question is one that can be answered differently, depending on one's approach. I simply look as the passive voice as incorporating the past participle, acting as an adjective (but which can also be used as an adjective in a slightly different construction).
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Hi Avangi,

<<As a result of the collision, two of her fingers were completely severed.
(passive, possibly active), No! This can not be an active sentence!

<< As a result of the collision, two of her fingers were completely gone. (only active) Yes, "gone" is used adjectivally. meaning absent, not present But It has nothing to do with what we have discussed.

I know there are differing opinions, even among experts who couldn't agree on the usage of past particple as adjective. I have learned it both ways and I had tried to explain it the best I could in the last thread. If I am not mistaken, Philip seemed to have accepted my apporach.
Thanks much, Philip and Goodman.
Mikael know the rules that say "A verb is an action word" and "An adjective is a describing word", but it's not enough to me.
rather simply, an adverb adds to the meaning of a verb and an adjective describes a noun.

In your example: The people were injured. "were injured" is the verb. How bad they were injured is "seriously" hence it is an adverb.
The meeting was organised. "was organised" is the verb. How it was organised is "very badly" hence it is an adverb.

Your no. 3, the adjectives are describing a) the restaurant and b) the food. both restaurant and food are nouns, so words describing them are adjectives.
ditto no. 4.
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