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1. The man with the bicycle, old and rusty, is my father.

2. The man with the bicycle, old and angry, is my father.

1) Are both 1 and 2 correct English?

2) In 1, does "old and rusty" describe "the bicycle"?

3) In 2, does "old and angry" describe "the man"?

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fire11. The man with the bicycle, old and rusty, is my father.
2. The man with the bicycle, old and angry, is my father.
1) Are both 1 and 2 correct English?

They aren't really "normal" sentences. If encountered in real life, they would seem deliberately "creative". In interpreting them, we use common sense, and apply the adjectives to the noun that they can sensibly describe.

The "normal" way to say these is:

1. The man with the old and rusty bicycle is my father.
2. The old and angry man with the bicycle is my father.

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1. The man with the bicycle, old and rusty, is my father.

2. The man with the bicycle, old and angry, is my father.


Yes, they are both fine.

In 1. the adjective phrase “old and rusty” logically refers to “the bicycle”, while in 2. "old and angry" can only refer to “the man".

If you're interested in the grammar, because the adjective phrases are not actually part of the noun phrases they relate to, but are located in clause structure, they are sometimes called ‘predicative adjuncts'.

Your examples are phrased oddly, though. For a more natural way of expressing the same meanings, see GPY's answer.

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Comments  
GPYGPY

1. In novels, are such sentences common? and is it acceptable to write sentences like them?

GPYIn interpreting them, we use common sense, and apply the adjectives to the noun that they can sensibly describe.

2. Then, you mean that your answers on questions 2 and 3 are yes?

I mean whether in sentence 1, the adjective phrase "old and rusty" is describing "the bicycle", and whether it can be acceptable to write a sentence like 1 in novels.

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fire11. In novels, are such sentences common? and is it acceptable to write sentences like them?

I wouldn't use the word "common", but a novel is a place where this kind of creative style may occur, yes, depending on the overall style in which the novel is written.

fire12. Then, you mean that your answers on questions 2 and 3 are yes?

Unless a man can be rusty, or a bicycle can be angry!

BillJBillJ

I have one more question about sentence A below.

A. "There's my daughter with a doll sitting on the bench"

□ Situation 1 = S1

- The daughter is standing behind the bench and the doll is sitting on it.

□ Situation 2 = S2

- The daughter is sitting on the bench and the doll is sitting on her lap.

Q1) Is sentence A correct English?

Q2) In S1, is it correct to grammatically analyze the adjective phrase "sitting on the bench" as describing only "a doll"?

Q3) In S2, is it correct to grammatically analyze "sitting on the bench" as describing only "the woman"?

Q4) Is it grammatically correct to write an adjective phrase to describe only the object of "with" like in Q2?

There's my daughter with a doll sitting on the bench.

You ask some unusual questions! I think I understand them correctly.

Q1: Yes, it’s grammatically correct.

Q2: Yes, but note that “sitting on the bench” is not an adjective phrase, though it has a modifying function like adjectives do. It’s actually a participial clause modifying “doll”. It has a similar meaning to the relative clause in “with a doll that is sitting on the bench”.

Q3: Yes: it’s the daughter who is sitting on the bench. The fact that she has a doll on her lap doesn't mean that the doll is sitting on he bench.

Q4: Yes.

Note that since you are suggesting two different interpretations, your sentence is bound to be ambiguous. To avoid ambiguities arising, your listener would need to be aware of the relevant scenario, or they wouldn't be able to tell which one was intended.

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BillJ1. The man with the bicycle, old and rusty, is my father. 2. The man with the bicycle, old and angry, is my father.Yes, they are both fine.
BillJYour examples are phrased oddly, though

Thank you very much, BillJ, and just one more thing.

Maybe don't you think 1 and 2 are grammatically correct?

I'm not sure whether both 1 and 2 perfectly grammatical.

This is my last question on this topic.

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