What is an 'adjective satellite'?
It appeared for several words in a friends PDA dictionary. The phrase also gets 14,200 hits in Google (often seen in the company of 'synset', whatever that is).
Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
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What is an 'adjective satellite'? It appeared for several words in a friends PDA dictionary. The phrase also gets 14,200 hits in Google (often seen in the company of 'synset', whatever that is).

I checked M-W to see if there was a meaning of "adjective" different from the one we know and love. How about this one:
2 : not standing by itself : DEPENDENT

Best Donna Richoux
What is an 'adjective satellite'? It appeared for several words in a friends PDA dictionary. The phrase also gets 14,200 hits in Google (often seen in the company of 'synset', whatever that is).

"Synset" is obviously a fancy spelling adopted by a group of people who meet for immoral purposes: cf "Hellfire Club". An "adjective satellite", therefore, is as clearly a euphemism for "*** satellite": cf Kipling's "the Adjective", or more mildly "the Great Australian Adjective" = "bloody".

Mike.
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What is an 'adjective satellite'? It appeared for several words in a friends PDA dictionary. The phrase also gets 14,200 hits in Google (often seen in the company of 'synset', whatever that is).

Googling on "all of the words" "synset" and "exact phrase" "adjective satellite" gives me only 46 hits, but the abstracts seem ominously abstruse.
I get the feeling this is something someone at sci.lang should be able to help with. It's a case where crossposting seems appropriate and desirable.
What is an 'adjective satellite'? It appeared for several words ... (often seen in the company of 'synset', whatever that is).

Googling on "all of the words" "synset" and "exact phrase" "adjective satellite" gives me only 46 hits, but the abstracts seem ominously abstruse.

Synset is supposed to be a machine readable set of words ordered by meaning, a synonym set. I think that 'satellite adjective' and other expressions related to this system of organization are using orbital satellites as an analogy. If Y is a satellite of X, then Y has some close relation to X. More than sci.lang, or perhaps in addition to, a group discussing AI seems like a possibility.

School Time
Husk of your mind bedecked with planks
Hand hewn by the well schooled shanks
To hold tight the juices from your soul
Before they're sucked clean out a hole
Like a black widow does its mate.
There's the bell, don't be late!
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Synset is supposed to be a machine readable set of words ordered by meaning, a synonym set. I think that ... orbital satellites as an analogy. If Y is a satellite of X, then Y has some close relation to X.

If that's all there is to it, it seems a tautology: Y is adjective to X.

How about its being one of those phrases where the adjective, in this case 'satellite', is placed after instead of before the noun it qualifies, in this case 'adjective'. Like 'crown imperial' or 'proof positive'.
So the phrase might denote an adjective that is in some sense satellite to its noun; and the word satellite might then imply that the adjective can 'orbit' the noun, that is to say might equally commonly in normal language either precede or succeed it, or that the adjective is slave to the noun; here we can branch again and imagine that a slave adjective might be one that invariably accompanies the noun, or has a meaning that is peculiar to that noun.
(That's enough speculation. -Ed.)
More than sci.lang, or perhaps in addition to, a group discussing AI seems like a possibility.

Paul
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What is an 'adjective satellite'? It appeared for several words in a friends PDA dictionary. The phrase also gets 14,200 hits in Google (often seen in the company of 'synset', whatever that is).

I assume you are talking about WordNet.
According to section 3.3.1 of Philpot, Fleischmann, and Hovy (2003): (I'll forego the "et alia" since I know Ed Hovy)
'Each synset has associated with it pointers to the lexical items that populate it, hyponyms and hypernyms, ... Adjectives are further grouped into adjective satellite sets; the center of each set (e.g., "dry") contains the general characteristic, while the satellites ("arid", "rainless", "thirsty", etc.).'
(http://www.mit.edu/~mbf/ILC 03.pdf)
So, a adjective satellite set is a kind of synset.

Joseph
To clarify slightly:
Certain adjectives bind minimal meaning. e.g. "dry", "good", &tc. Each of these is the center of an adjective synset in WN.

Adjective satellites imposes additional commitments on top of the meaning of the central adjective, e.g. "arid" = "dry" + a particular context (i.e. climates)
What is an 'adjective satellite'?
It appeared for several words in a friend's PDA dictionary. The phrase also gets 14,200 hits in Google (often seen in the company of 'synset', whatever that is).

I assume you are talking about WordNet.
According to section 3.3.1 of Philpot, Fleischmann, and Hovy (2003): (I'll forego the "et alia" since I know Ed Hovy)
'Each synset has associated with it pointers to the lexical items that populate it, hyponyms and hypernyms, ... Adjectives are further grouped into adjective satellite sets; the center of each set (e.g., "dry") contains the general characteristic, while the satellites ("arid", "rainless", "thirsty", etc.).'

(http://www.mit.edu/~mbf/ILC 03.pdf)
So, a adjective satellite set is a kind of synset.

To clarify slightly:
Certain adjectives bind minimal meaning. e.g. "dry", "good", &tc. Each of these is the center of an adjective synset in WN.

Adjective satellites imposes additional commitments on top of the meaning of the central adjective, e.g.
"arid" = "dry" + a particular context (i.e. climates)
That must be it.
So, for that dictionary we would expect 'dry' to be announced as an 'adjective center'?
Richard Maurer To reply, remove half
Sunnyvale, California of a homonym of a synonym for also.
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