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Hi.

When you place more than one adjective before a noun, you would use "and" and you wouldn't. How would you decide which to follow? Here's an example. Which sentence sounds better?

[1] She is a personable, forward-looking, proactive young lady.

[2] She is a personable, forward-looking and proactive young lady.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Hiro/ Sendai, Japan
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Comments  
Hi, HSS

When you have two things to describe, a simple “AND” will do

When you have more than 3 items to list, use a comma afte reach item and apply an “And” before the last item.

Ex: She is warm, friendly, sincere and pretty.



I’ve invited Mary, John, Paul, Susan and my co-workers to my birthday party.

Another anternative is to use “as well as “

My new job works me to death! I have to take care of the coffee room, reception, mailroom as well as my job as a book keeper.
Hi Goodman,

I'd say My new job works me to death! I have to take care of the coffee room, reception, and mailroom as well as my job as a book keeper.

Best wishes, Clive
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Hi Clive,

Totally understood. I was just pointing out an alternative; aside from using "and".
Oh-oh, I must have misled you. I know how we normally line up nouns, adverbs, etc., but I was just wondering if there was any difference between "a personable, forward-looking, proactive young lady" and "a personable, forward-looking, and proactive young lady." I somehow keep seeing nouns with more than one adjective before it withtout 'and' in the line of adjectives.

Hiro/ Sendai, Japan
Hello HSS

I take them as follows:
She is a personable, forward-looking, proactive young lady.
=The proactive young lady is personable as well as forward-looking.
She is a personable, forward-looking and proactive young lady.
=The young lady is personable, forward-looking, and proactive
or =The young lady is not only personable but also (forward-looking and proactive).

By the way I find it somehow odd that "personable" is used to describe a young lady.

paco
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Hi, Paco.

How are you? Your interpretation is quite interesting. Thanks. Just gotten back home from a long day's work, and so my brain cells are inert at the moment. But I'll certainly give it some thought later on.

Paco2004By the way I find it somehow odd that "personable" is used to describe a young lady.


I used "personable" to mean "having pleasant and likable personality." Doesn't it go along with "young lady"? More of your enlightenment would be appreciated.

Hiro
Hello HSS

I'm sorry I was wrong. My E-J Genius dictionary says "personable" is a word used to praise young men but I have now checked it in other dictionaries (OED and Webster) and have found they do not mention such a gender bias in the use.

Googlily this word is used like below.
She is personable 649, He is personable 12,100.
A personable young woman 228, A personable young man 875.

paco
Without so much the interpretation of dictionary, "personable", to me; has no gender bias. A person with a personable personality is said to be someone with warm, friendly and pleasant characteristics.
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