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The adjective "earlier" follows the noun "sunsets". Can anyone state ... when it precedes the noun in English? Mike Hardy

How about "when you could insert 'that are' between the two"?

That doesn't work, because you could say "houses that are yellow" but you would not say "houses yellow". Mike Hardy
I did notice. When I looked it up, the definition that was most applicable was listed as an adverb. If ... as it does the time the sunsets occur, thereby making it an adverb. It seems like a toss-up to me.

My "attitude" comes only from the fact that the person who called it an adverb not only was plainly wrong, but seemed unwilling to understand the issue. In the phrase "an early sunset", the word "early" refers to the time when the sunset occurs and is an adjective. This notion that any word that refers to time is an adverb is idiotic nonsense. Mike Hardy
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I did notice. When I looked it up, the definition tha was most applicable was listed as an adverb. If the sunset will no longer be occurring by 6, then "earlier" than 6 would be adverbial, according to Merriam-Webster,

You are lying about what that dictionary says.
Click on the adjective, and read:
Main Entry: 2early Function: adjective
How about "when you could insert 'that are' between the two"?

That doesn't work, because you could say "houses that are yellow" but you would not say "houses yellow". Mike Hardy

"The houses yellow looked out of place, jaundiced, as their sickly dots despoiled the flag motif forced by onerous neighbourhood covenants on the others, red, white, and a even a few blue, by owners who had long ago moved away to parts less restrictive, Oklahoma, Arizona, the Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve."

What I can't figure out is why no one seems to point out that while private accounts won't solve the 2042 problem, perhaps they will push it back a ways, they certainly will help solve the 2017 problem, when the general fund has to start paying back its loans from Social Security while the general fund is still, presumably, in massive deficit.
How about "when you could insert 'that are' between the two"?

That doesn't work, because you could say "houses that are yellow" but you would not say "houses yellow". Mike Hardy

Trying this and that, I go back to the fact that you gave us a comparative. "Yellower," not "yellow."
In this town, there are no houses yellower than ours. In this town, there are no houses that are yellower than ours.

Best - Donna Richoux
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I did notice. When I looked it up, the definition ... making it an adverb. It seemslike a toss-up to me.

My "attitude" comes only from the fact that the person who called it an adverb not only was plainly wrong, ... an adjective. This notion that any word that refers to time is an adverb is idiotic nonsense. Mike Hardy

So what if somebody is wrong. That's no excuse. Your attitude sucks. Welcome to my killfile.
Mike
still I did notice. When I looked it up, the definition that was mostapplicable was listed as an adverb.

No it wasn't. You decided that, but you decided wrongly. You chose the definition in the incorrect word class. In ... two problems. You don't understand how a dictionary is organized, and you are rather confused about what an adverb is.

The way the sentence is constructed, the usage of "earlier" implies a verb. In this case, "earlier" is describing when sunsets happen, not which type of sunset is going to be occurring. Earlier can be an adjective, but it isn't in this case. I chose wisely.
Mike
2 a : occurring before the usual or expected time b :

Did you bother checking the adverb listing? I didn't think so. You're still wrong. I do not wish to debate this with you any longer. You owe me an apology.
Mike
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The Dictionary says its an adverb. Go *** under their bridge if you still have trouble with the idea.

It is an adverb when it's used in certain ways. That does not alter the fact that it's obviously an adjective when one writes about "an earlier sunset". Sheesh. Mike Hardy

That was not what your original post was asking about. Your question was about sunsets occuring before a certain time, not "an earlier sunset." They are two different issues.
"I prefer earlier sunsets" has earlier modifying sunsets.

"After the 1st of March there will be no sunsets earlier than 6:00 PM" has earlier modifying the occurance of sunsets.
If you don't agree, fine. I'm giving you the last word on this topic.

Mike
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