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That doesn't work, because you could say "houses that are yellow" but you would not say "houses yellow". Mike Hardy

"The houses yellow looked out of place, jaundiced, as their sickly dots despoiled the flag motif forced by onerous neighbourhood ... blue, by owners who had long ago moved away to parts less restrictive, Oklahoma, Arizona, the Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve."

I wonder if it would kill you to say whom or what you're quoting?

Anyway, as I said, that word order does not fall effortlessly off the tongue. Mike Hardy
In this town, there are no houses yellower than ours. In this town, there are no houses that are yellower than ours.

You could also say "there are no houses yellow enough to rival ours", and although its "comparative" in a semantic sense, it's not grammatically comparative. And remember:
"There are no physicists knowledgeable in that area."

No comparative here. Mike Hardy
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In this town, there are no houses yellower than ours. In this town, there are no houses that are yellower than ours.

You could also say "there are no houses yellow enough to rival ours", and although its "comparative" in a semantic sense, it's not grammatically comparative. And remember: "There are no physicists knowledgeable in that area." No comparative here. Mike Hardy

All right, but now what is the same is that we have a phrase, not a single word. It's not:
*He is a physicist knowledgeable.
*There will be no sunsets earlier.
(Which actually is OK if the meaning of "earlier" had been discussed.)

As as been pointed out, these adjectival phrases could be connected with a "that" or "who", which by agreement can also be omitted:

He is a physicist who is knowledgeable in that area. He is a physicist knowledgeable in that area.
That raises the question of when to separate the noun and adjective with a comma, which I think depends on whether the adjective restricts the noun, or merely adds some description:
He is a physicist (who is) knowledgeable in that area. (As opposed to physicists who are not.)
He is a fine physicist, knowledgeable in that area, and easy to talk to.
We found a house, yellow on the outside, all white inside.

Best Donna Richoux
How about the exception 'deed poll' where the adjective follows the noun?

There are certainly plenty of exceptions in poetic and antiquated language: I sing the body electric, heir apparent, etc.

There are examples galore. Postnominal adjectives aplenty. Go to the city proper and have lunch with the sentator elect and the president pro tempore. Order the soup du jour and the pie a la mode.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >Well, if you can't believe what you
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >read in a comic book, what can youPalo Alto, CA 94304 >believe?!

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Yes, and in "No one may keep a cat heavier ... of the cat. I guess. If that's what you're saying.

Returning to the question: "No one may keep a cat heavier than mine." The adjective "heavier" follows the noun "cat". What's the rule? When does the adjective follow the noun in English and when does it precede it? Mike Hardy

I think you've put your finger on it. With the exception of a few adjectives which always follow the noun, English adjectives tend to only follow the noun when they are the heads of adjectival phrases which are sufficiently heavy.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >You cannot solve problems with the
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >same type of thinking that createdPalo Alto, CA 94304 >them.

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That doesn't work, because you could say "houses that are yellow" but you would not say "houses yellow". Mike Hardy

"The houses yellow looked out of place, jaundiced, as their sickly dots despoiled the flag motif forced by onerous neighbourhood ... blue, by owners who had long ago moved away to parts less restrictive, Oklahoma, Arizona, the Fakahatchee Strand State Preserve."

Somebody's misprint or error. It should be "The houses' yellow..." (parallel to "their sickly dots").
Who did write it? CDB
Order the soup du jour and the pie a la mode.

Those aren't adjectives. They're prepositional phrases. And can we really call them English?
Stewart.

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Order the soup du jour and the pie a la mode.

Those aren't adjectives. They're prepositional phrases.

In French, not in English. In English, they're adjectives. MWCD11 concurs
Main Entry: à la mode
Variant(s): also a la mode
Function: adjective
Etymology: French, according to the fashion
Date: 1646

1 : FASHIONABLE, STYLISH
2 : topped with ice cream

Main Entry: du jour
Function: adjective
Etymology: French, literally, of the day
Date: 1786

1 : made for a particular day used of an item not specified onthe regular menu

2 : popular, fashionable, or prominent at a particular time
And can we really call them English?

I certainly can. They appear in English sentences, have been around a long time, can be applied to any relevant noun ("brownie a la mode", "policy du jour"), are used by people who don't speak French and who don't know they're borrowings.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >In the beginning, there were no
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >reasons, there were only causes.Palo Alto, CA 94304 > Daniel Dennet

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Those aren't adjectives. They're prepositional phrases.

In French, not in English. In English, they're adjectives. MWCD11 concurs

That's news to me, that when transferring phrases between languages they change their part of speech even if the position in a sentence remains exactly the same.
For that matter, does Latin grammar allow the equivalent of "an ad hoc committee"?
And there seems to be disagreement over whether "supreme" as in "chicken supreme" is a noun or an adjective. And whether it's "supreme" or "suprême". And whether it exists at all.
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.
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