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And we spell "a la mode" with no accent on the à, so it can't be French.

(Rats, I forgot I wasn't going to respond to this thread anymore, for fear that guy would come back again to tell me I wasn't answering his question. Oh well.)
In French, not in English. In English, they're adjectives. MWCD11 concurs

That's news to me, that when transferring phrases between languages they change their part of speech even if the position in a sentence remains exactly the same.

I don't think that it's all that uncommon for entire fixed prepositional phrases to become reinterpreted as adjectives or adverbs when borrowed. For them to have been borrowed as prepositional phrases, the prepositions themselves would have to have been borrowed.

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Evan Kirshenbaum filted:
That's news to me, that when transferring phrases between languages ... if the position in a sentence remains exactly the same.

I don't think that it's all that uncommon for entire fixed prepositional phrases to become reinterpreted as adjectives or adverbs when borrowed. For them to have been borrowed as prepositional phrases, the prepositions themselves would have to have been borrowed.

They get reinterpreted even when they're not borrowed...mind you that's just an off-the-cuff reaction..r
In French, not in English. In English, they're adjectives. MWCD11 concurs

That's news to me, that when transferring phrases between languages they change their part of speech even if the ... "chicken supreme" is a noun or an adjective. And whether it's "supreme" or "suprême". And whether it exists at all.

I can't think of any reason why "chicken supreme" should have any connection with the French language. And it's certainly not a "suprême" which by rights should be the French dish "suprême de volailles". OTOH, "chicken supreme" may not exist in the sense that there's no specific dish known by that name.

(Later) A quick search of recipecenter.com turns up only one dish called "chicken supreme" (as opposed to Mel Tillis' chicken and rice supreme, for example). And in fact the recipe does sound a little like suprême de volailles. But then most chicken recipes these days are for chicken breasts in one form or another.
That's news to me, that when transferring phrases between ... it's "supreme" or "suprême". And whether it exists at all.

I can't think of any reason why "chicken supreme" should have anyconnection with the French language. And it's certainly not a "suprême" which byrights should be the French dish "suprême de volailles".

Oops, that should be "suprême de volaille". Or "suprêmes de volailles", I suppose.
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you decided

wrongly. You chose the definition in the incorrect word class. In the sentence in question, "earlier" is an adjective.

The way the sentence is constructed, the usage of "earlier" implies a verb.

Ah, there was your blunder, then. You put your
finger on it.
Cheers.
\\P. Schultz
Your attitude sucks. Welcome to my killfile.

HIS attitude?
Please put me in there too, ya git.
\\P. Schultz
I can't think of any reason why "chicken supreme" should have any connection with the French language.

There used to be a tennis champ named Peaches
Barkowitz. I think they honored her by concocting
a fancy dessert with her name on it. It sounds
tray French, nez pah?
\\P. Schultz
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I can't think of any reason why "chicken supreme" should have any connection with the French language.

There used to be a tennis champ named Peaches Barkowitz. I think they honored her by concocting a fancy dessert with her name on it. It sounds tray French, nez pah?

In 2002, Jane Marie "Peaches" Bartkowicz, of Hamtramck, MI, was inducted into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame. (And did you know that "Peaches" had a sister nicknamed "Plums"?)
Maria Conlon, resident of southeast Michigan, near Detroit (and Hamtramck).
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