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Maria Conlon wrote on 24 Feb 2005:
There used to be a tennis champ named Peaches Barkowitz. ... her name on it. It sounds tray French, nez pah?

In 2002, Jane Marie "Peaches" Bartkowicz, of Hamtramck, MI, was inducted into the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame. (And did you know that "Peaches" had a sister nicknamed "Plums"?)

So Peaches had the boob job, huh?
"if you don't like my peaches,
Don't shake my tree.
And if you don't want my potatoes,
don't mash my digger down so hard."

Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
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"The only problem with seeing too much is that
it makes you insane." Phaedrus
Your attitude sucks. Welcome to my killfile.

HIS attitude? Please put me in there too, ya git.

Poor Uma Thurman.
Mike
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I certainly can. They appear in English sentences, have been around a long time, can be applied to any relevant noun ("brownie a la mode", "policy du jour"), are used by people who don't speak French and who don't know they're borrowings.

Do many bother to ask what the English words "du", "jour" and "la" mean by themselves?
Stewart.

My e-mail is valid but not my primary mailbox. Please keep replies on the 'group where everyone may benefit.

I certainly can. They appear in English sentences, have been ... who don't speak French and who don't know they're borrowings.

Do many bother to ask what the English words "du", "jour" and "la" mean by themselves?

I think that most Americans have probably internalized the words by the time they see them written out and realize that they're written as phrases. Sort of like "hors d'oeuvre".

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Do many bother to ask what the English words "du", "jour" and "la" mean by themselves?

I think that most Americans have probably internalized the words by the time they see them written out and realize that they're written as phrases. Sort of like "hors d'oeuvre".

So, for example, "chicken hors d'oeuvres" is an example of what? Is 'chicken' an adjective?

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I think that most Americans have probably internalized the words ... that they're written as phrases. Sort of like "hors d'oeuvre".

So, for example, "chicken hors d'oeuvres" is an example of what? Is 'chicken' an adjective?

I'd call it a noun in a noun-noun collocation. Whatever it is there, I'd says that it's the same as it is in "chicken soup", "chicken sandwich", "chicken casserole", and "chicken pot pie".

"Hors d'oeuvre" is definitely a noun in English, notwithstanding its origin as a French prepositional phrase.

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >He who will not reason, is a bigot;
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 >he who cannot is a fool; and he whoPalo Alto, CA 94304 >dares not is a slave.

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So, for example, "chicken hors d'oeuvres" is an example of what? Is 'chicken' an adjective?

Here it is an attributive noun. It fills an
Adjective Phrase slot. It means one of four things:
1. Special snacks fed to chickens.
2. Snacks shaped like chickens.
3. Snacks containing chicken meat.
4. Cowardly snacks (this would be in a poeticcontext).
\\P. Schultz
So, for example, "chicken hors d'oeuvres" is an example of what? Is 'chicken' an adjective?

I'd call it a noun in a noun-noun collocation. Whatever it is there, I'd says that it's the same as it is in "chicken soup", "chicken sandwich", "chicken casserole", and "chicken pot pie".

So in "big casserole", the word 'big' is an adjective but the word 'chicken' is a noun in "chicken casserole"? What is the difference between a noun and an adjective in English?
"Hors d'oeuvre" is definitely a noun in English, notwithstanding its origin as a French prepositional phrase.

How about in this example?: "All we had was this measly hors d'oeuvre dinner."

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I'd call it a noun in a noun-noun collocation. Whatever ... "chicken soup", "chicken sandwich", "chicken casserole", and "chicken pot pie".

So in "big casserole", the word 'big' is an adjective but the word 'chicken' is a noun in "chicken casserole"? What is the difference between a noun and an adjective in English?

Fuzzy, in some cases. If it can stand alone as the head of a noun phrase or the object of a preposition, without an implied "one", it's probably a noun. If it is commonly inflected to show a comparative or superlative degree or if it can be modified by "very", it's probably an adjective. With regard to materials (e.g., "steel", "beef"), you can often argue it either way.
Other languages have dealt with the loss of case markings in other ways. The "chicken" examples above would be "de pollo" in Spanish, which implies that at least historically that role would have been filled by an inflected noun, not an adjective.
Occasionally, you find words that have different forms when used as adjectives and attributive nouns, and that sometimes makes the distinction easier. For example, in "state champion", a good argument can be made that "state" is an adjective, since the parallel would be "national champion", not "*nation champion".
"Hors d'oeuvre" is definitely a noun in English, notwithstanding its origin as a French prepositional phrase.

How about in this example?: "All we had was this measly hors d'oeuvre dinner."

That's as much (or as little) a noun as "steak" is in "steak dinner".

Evan Kirshenbaum + HP Laboratories >The whole idea of our government is
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