"After the 1st of March there will be no sunsets
earlier than 6:00 PM."
The adjective "earlier" follows the noun "sunsets".

Can anyone state a rule saying when the adjective
follows the noun and when it precedes the noun in
English? Mike Hardy
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"After the 1st of March there will be no sunsets earlier than 6:00 PM." The adjective "earlier" follows the noun "sunsets". Can anyone state a rule saying when the adjective follows the noun and when it precedes the noun in English? Mike Hardy

"Earlier" is an adverb, because it refers to the time it takes place. It modifies hmm. Well, I'm not exactly sure what it modifies, maybe a hidden adjective like "occurring" after "sunsets".
"After the 1st of March there will be no sunsets earlier than 6:00 PM." The adjective "earlier" follows the noun "sunsets". Can anyone state a rule saying when the adjective follows the noun and when it precedes the noun in English?

You aren't supposed to write stuff like this in English: "After the 1st of March there will be no earlier than 6:00 PM sunsets."
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"After the 1st of March there will be no sunsets ... when it precedes the noun in English? Mike Hardy

"Earlier" is an adverb, because it refers to the time it takes place.

Yes, and in "No one may keep a cat heavier than 15 pounds," "heavier" is an adverb because it refers
to the weight of the cat. I guess. If that's what
you're saying.
\\P. Schultz
"Earlier" is an adverb, because it refers to the time it takes place. It modifies hmm. Well, I'm not exactly sure what it modifies, maybe a hidden adjective like "occurring" after "sunsets".

"There will be an earlier sunset."
You're saying that's an adverb ?
That's nonsense. If you learned some simple-minded rule that all words refering to time are adverbs, unlearn it.

Mike Hardy
Yes, and in "No one may keep a cat heavier than 15 pounds," "heavier" is an adverb because it refers to the weight of the cat. I guess. If that's what you're saying.

Returning to the question:
"No one may keep a cat heavier than mine."
The adjective "heavier" follows the noun "cat".
What's the rule? When does the adjective follow the noun in English and when does it precede it? Mike Hardy
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"There will be an earlier sunset." You're saying that's an adverb ? That's nonsense. If you learned some simple-minded rule that all words refering to time are adverbs, unlearn it.

The Dictionary says its an adverb. Go *** under their bridge if you still have trouble with the idea.
http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=earlier

Main Entry: 1ear·ly
Pronunciation: '&r-lE
Function: adverb
Inflected Form(s): ear·li·er; -est
2 a : before the usual or expected time

Mike
"After the 1st of March there will be no sunsets ... when it precedes the noun in English? Mike Hardy

"Earlier" is an adverb, because it refers to the time it takes place. It modifies hmm. Well, I'm not exactly sure what it modifies, maybe a hidden adjective like "occurring" after "sunsets".

You can say 'Sunsets earlier than 6pm are common around December'. Then it's an adjective. Or, rather, the whole phrase 'earlier than 6 pm' works as an adjective.

john
"After the 1st of March there will be no sunsets earlier than 6:00 PM." The adjective "earlier" follows the noun "sunsets". Can anyone state a rule saying when the adjective follows the noun and when it precedes the noun in English? Mike Hardy

How about "when you could insert 'that are' between the two"?

Your example sentence is basically "after the 1st of March there will be no sunsets (that are) earlier than 6:00 PM".
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