+0
Can we use an adjective made noun as singular? Incidentally, should it be 6 feet tall or 6 foot tall?

eg. He is a white and 6 feet tall.

I hear adjectives made noun are normally plural.
eg. The rich are helping the poor in their country.

Is it not possible to use it as singular like in the last sentence of the following?
eg. Once upon a time, there was a rich man and a poor man. The rich man was always helping the poor one. However, the poor was not appreciative of any help received from the rich.

I would very much appreciate your assistance here. Thanks.
1 2
Comments  
Can we use an adjective made noun as singular?-- No; it must refer to a class bearing that characteristic.

6 feet tall (predicate adjective) or 6-foot-tall (attributive adjective)

I hear adjectives made noun are normally plural.-- Right.

Is it not possible to use it as singular like in the last sentence of the following?-- it's not possible.

Once upon a time, there was a rich man and a poor man. The rich man was always helping the poor one. However, the poor one was not appreciative of any help received from the rich one.
Thank you so much for your response.
Mister MicawberCan we use an adjective made noun as singular?-- No; it must refer to a class bearing that characteristic.
I see they should always be plural meaning "the white" (without s) is a plural noun. However, I found the following example in a dictionary: The neighbourhood is populated mainly by whites.
I'm confused because "the white" and "the whites" are both plural nouns. Also, if "whites" are acceptable, then why not the singular "a white". Please enlighten me.

Mister Micawber6 feet tall (predicate adjective) or 6-foot-tall (attributive adjective)

Therefore, he is 6 feet tall and he is 6-foot-tall are both correct.
What is the difference between predicate adjective and attributive adjective in the example?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I'm confused because "the white" and "the whites" are both plural nouns. Also, if "whites" are acceptable, then why not the singular "a white". -- It is simply that you cannot freely create adjectival pronouns.

"6 feet tall (predicate adjective) or 6-foot-tall (attributive adjective)" Therefore, he is 6 feet tall and he is 6-foot-tall are both correct.-- No.
What is the difference between predicate adjective and attributive adjective?-- Attibutive adjectives precede the noun (the 6-foot-tall pedestal). Predicative adjectives appear after the verb (The pedestal is 6 feet tall).
Again, thank you for your explanations. I now understand attributive and predicative adjectives. I just have a follow up question below.
Mister MicawberI'm confused because "the white" and "the whites" are both plural nouns. Also, if "whites" are acceptable, then why not the singular "a white". -- It is simply that you cannot freely create adjectival pronouns.

1. Do you mean we cannot freely create adjectival pronouns as singular, but we can only create them as plural like 'whites' in my example and 'the white' to refer to a class?

2. I'm not sure about the meaning of adjectival pronouns. Are they simply adjectives made pronoun?
3. Do my examples below have adjectival pronouns or adjectival nouns?

The neighbourhood is populated only by whites.
Jim lives alone and is one of the neighbours there.
Therefore, his house is occupied by a white.

I presume the first sentence above is correct since it's from a dictionary, although I changed the adverb to 'only' to use as a premise for the 3rd sentence. Is the 3rd sentence still incorrect and therefore I should use 'a white one'?
1. Do you mean we cannot freely create adjectival pronouns as singular, but we can only create them as plural like 'whites' in my example and 'the white' to refer to a class?-- No, my feeling is that you cannot freely create either, though obviously someone does and they come into use. There are a number of accepted ones (the rich/the homeless/the aged/singles/whites - but not yellows or reds or marrieds); but many simply are not used (the good, the bad and the ugly appear only in a movie title).

2. I'm not sure about the meaning of adjectival pronouns. Are they simply adjectives made pronoun?-- Yes, that was my intent.

3. Do my examples below have adjectival pronouns or adjectival nouns?-- Your middle one has neither. I thought they were considered pronomial, but maybe they are nouns.

Is the 3rd sentence still incorrect and therefore I should use 'a white one'?-- I would call it not the standard way; but I certainly wouldn't use 'a white one', which is utterly inscrutable.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Mister Micawber-- No, my feeling is that you cannot freely create either, though obviously someone does and they come into use. There are a number of accepted ones (the rich/the homeless/the aged/singles/whites - but not yellows or reds or marrieds); but many simply are not used (the good, the bad and the ugly appear only in a movie title).
I can see your point here, so it really depends on whether the adjectival noun is widely accepted or not. Thank you for that clarification.
Mister Micawber-- I would call it not the standard way; but I certainly wouldn't use 'a white one', which is utterly inscrutable.
If 'a white' is not standard and 'a white one' is inscrutable, how should I rephrase this part of the sentence?
I suppose that the best option is this:

Therefore, his house is occupied by a white person.

Understand that the question of language appropriateness, in terms of racial reference, enters into the awkwardness of all these sentences.
Thank you very much for the answer.
Mister MicawberUnderstand that the question of language appropriateness, in terms of racial reference, enters into the awkwardness of all these sentences.
Just a question on this, if I may ask, because I'm not sure if I understand. When you said 'awkwardness', does it mean my sentences are bad in structure that my question is inappropriate to ask in the first place?

Or does 'awkwardness' mean my question could be uncomfortable and using the term 'white' could be offensive? I'm sorry if I used a bad example.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more