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I apologize in advance for my inappropriate question...but I need to figure this out.

I was watching a movie called "police academy" (yes again...) and there was this guy saying, "So tell me, you and the wife do it doggie-style, or what?"
My question is do we need "it"here?
I've googled this sentence with and without "it" and found that both phrases are used.

I also have a same kind of question.
In the states, many people asked me, "How do you like it here?"
Again, do we need "it" here? What does "it" stand for?

!!!Thank you for reading this!!!
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>In the states, many people asked me, "How do you like it here?" Again, do we need "it" here? What does "it" stand for?

Yes, "it" is needed here.

Example:
How do you like it here? ("it" is an object... my guess is that "here" can't be an object, which is required by a verb "like", because it's an adverb)
We always like it when you stay with us. (here, "it" is an object, referring forward to a clause that comes after)

Other verbs like this:
enjoy, hate, love, don't mind, resent
There are verbs which can be followed by a that-clause or wh-clause are not used with "it":
accept, discover, notice, predict, regret, remember
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On your first question:
In the movies I've always heard "do it" (it refers to having sex):

"Do you want to do it?"
"So, wanna do it?"

People usually know what "it" means. I think, it is needed.
So, in that case, we can possibly say, "How do you like America?" instead of saying "How do you like it here?"
Correct?
Does "it" in this sentence- "how do you like it here?"-have any particular meaning like food,life,people and so on? Or is it just an object?
Ha,I forgot to login..The post above (anonymous) was by me.

Yes, I know that "do it" refers to "have sex" but can we just say "do doggie style?"
I hope my post won't humiliate anyone.
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AnonymousSo, in that case, we can possibly say, "How do you like America?" instead of saying "How do you like it here?"
Correct?
Does "it" in this sentence- "how do you like it here?"-have any particular meaning like food,life,people and so on? Or is it just an object?

My guess is that "it" doesn't mean anything in this case. It's just an addition, an indefinite object.

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
5. As an indefinite object after some intransitive verbs, or
after a substantive used humorously as a verb; as, to foot
it (i. e., to walk).

The Lacedemonians, at the Straits of Thermopyl[ae],
when their arms failed them, fought it out with
nails and teeth. --Dryden.

Whether the charmer sinner it, or saint it, If folly
grows romantic, I must paint it. --Pope.

"Like" can be transitive or intransitive.

I don't know exactly. I have never heard it that way until today. I think it depends on if "doggy style" is a noun, adverb or even verb(disgusting reading: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=doggy+style ). One thing I am sure is that these variants are all informal :) A language is alive.

>I hope my post won't humiliate anyone.

Except maybe a dog Emotion: smile
Selecter5. As an indefinite object after some intransitive verbs, or
after a substantive used humorously as a verb; as, to foot
it (i. e., to walk).

Thank you Emotion: smile This really explains!
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