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Hi!

I saw this sentence the other day:

I'm sorry that I can't draw you, as beautiful as you really are.

My first instinct told me it's not correct because the adjective "beautiful" should not be used to modify the verb "draw". So I thought the correct sentence should be:

I'm sorry that I can't draw you, as beautifully as you really are.

But after having thought about it, I feel that they are both quite troublesome (at least to me) because even though the adjective beautiful has been changed to adverb to work with the verb "draw", it does not go with the clause " you really are", where the adjective "beautiful" is required.

I'm sorry that I'm not a grammar expert and as a result can't explain this any better using all those grammar terminologies. I hope you understand what I was on about and would kindly help me make sense of this. I'd also appreciate if anyone would correct me on anything I have written here or show me more "natural" ways of saying what I wanted to say!

Thanks a lot!
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chenyinchengMy first instinct told me it's not correct because the adjective "beautiful" should not be used to modify the verb "draw". So I thought the correct sentence should be:

I'm sorry that I can't draw you, as beautifully as you really are.
No. Your instinct may be good in many cases, but not here, unfortunately.

beautiful does not modify the verb draw. The grammatical pattern as ... as ... interferes. It's the entire as ... as ... clause that modifies draw, not the one word beautiful. Inside that clause is the idea: you are beautiful. So don't change it to beautifully.

CJ

By the way, you should take out the comma.
Also, many writers would prefer to add "to look", thus:

I'm sorry I can't draw you to look as beautiful as you are.

Or its equivalent with a so that clause:

I'm sorry I can't draw you so that you look as beautiful as you are.
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Thank you, CalifJim, for answering my question.Emotion: smile