+0
Ok, I am really confused about something.

An adverb gives more information about an adverb, an adjective, a verb or an other adverb.

Now in the following sentence:

The group will meet before lunch.

Before (according to my book) is a preposition.

But before gives more information about the verb “will meet” so I don’t get it.

Could someone clarify this for me?

Please, for the love of god, don’t tell me to Google it. I know how to use Google, what I don’t know is why some preposition seem to have the same function as an adverb. Don't want to sound rude here...

What am I missing?
1 2
Comments  
"Before" relates to "lunch" rather than to the verb - it tells you where/when the meeting is in relation to lunch.

"Before" relates to "lunch" rather than to the verb - it tells you where/when the meeting is in relation to lunch.
Ok.

But before does give information about the verb though, doesn't?

I'm just having a hard time figuring out a "rule" to discern adverbs from prepositions.

What would be a good way to define adverb and preposition so that their purpose and function is obvious?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Here, the word "before" alone doesnt give any information about the verb but the whole phrase "before lunch". So "before", in this sentence, is considered as a prep.
Here's an example of before as an adverb: "I havent seen this before". You see, the word "before" here isnt followed by any noun, and its function is just to clarify the verb so it must be an adverb.
As for distinguishing the specific class of a word, I often base on the context in which that word exists, as well as answer questions What? When? Where? and How?
I think you can simplify the situation by thinking of "before lunch" as a prepositional phrase used adverbially.
Hi, SeekerOf Peace

First of all don't forget this rule : in English there are necessray and unnecessary elements in a sentence.For example, subject and predicator are necessary ,if you omit them either the meaning will chance or it will not mean anything.But adverbials aren't necessary so if you omit them the sentence will still has a meaning.To find whether it is preposition or not omit before.What remains?

The group will meet lunch.You see sentence has no meaning in this form.Another example for you:

She came home on Wednesday.Omit on Wednesday.What remains? She came home.The sentence still has a meaning so here on Wednesday is adverbial.

The party was on Wednesay.Omit on Wednesday.What remains? The party was:D:DYou see no meaning at all.So we can tell that here on Wednesday is prepositional phrase.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
thanks (:
DollHi, SeekerOf Peace

First of all don't forget this rule : in English there are necessray and unnecessary elements in a sentence.For example, subject and predicator are necessary ,if you omit them either the meaning will chance or it will not mean anything.But adverbials aren't necessary so if you omit them the sentence will still has a meaning.To find whether it is preposition or not omit before.What remains?

The group will meet lunch.You see sentence has no meaning in this form.Another example for you:

She came home on Wednesday.Omit on Wednesday.What remains? She came home.The sentence still has a meaning so here on Wednesday is adverbial.

The party was on Wednesay.Omit on Wednesday.What remains? The party was:D:DYou see no meaning at all.So we can tell that here on Wednesday is prepositional phrase.


Hum... I'm not sure I don't understand this sentence:

"To find whether it is preposition or not omit before."

Do you mean that to find if it's a preposition I should try omitting it and see if the sentence still makes sense?

So in the sentence:

"The group will meet before lunch."

If I remove "before" the sentence doesn't make sense, which means that before is a preposition.

I think I see your point.

Take the following sentence:

The castle is north of a city.

"north of" is an adverb.

But if I omit north of the sentence becomes:

The castle of a city.

So the sentence doesn't make sense anymore. Wouldn't that make it a preposition? My book says it's an adverb.

???

EDIT:
Here's an example of before as an adverb: "I havent seen this before". You see, the word "before" here isnt followed by any noun, and its function is just to clarify the verb so it must be an adverb.
Thanks for your explanation.

In my example:

The castle is north of a city.

"north of" is followed by a noun. I don't understand why it's not a preposition.
The castle is north of a city. Sorry but I really didn't like this sentence.It seems to me that something is missing like in/on or an article.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Show more