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Just the other day my wife asked me why "So ... I had no idea. All I could say was, "Syntax."

Does she worry about the difference between "Mary asked John" and "John asked Mary"?

If Mary is in the nominative case and John is in the objective case in both sentences, then the two sentences mean the same thing.
Does she worry about the difference between "Mary asked John" and "John asked Mary"?

If Mary is in the nominative case and John is in the objective case in both sentences, then the two sentences mean the same thing.

Now I se why they call you the Grammer Genious and not the Grammar Genius
John Dean
Oxford
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Now I see why they call you the Grammer Genious and not the Grammar Genius

Hey I'm not seeing that.
But speaking of adverb placement, how come it's allowed for bureaucrats to say things like "the tactical cooperation necessary to combat effectively this criminal activity" and "the ability to treat thoroughly the wide range of topics covered," but I'm not allowed to say that I like to ride daily my bicycle to town?
Now I see why they call you the Grammer Genious and not the Grammar Genius

Hey I'm not seeing that. But speaking of adverb placement, how come it's allowed for bureaucrats to say things like ... range of topics covered," but I'm not allowed to say that I like to ride daily my bicycle to town?

I diligently shall investigate that issue and promptly shall report.
I diligently shall investigate that issue and promptly shall report.

A German friend recently asked me whether "In so doing, the President broke the convention that ..." was acceptable English, or whether he should use "In doing so ..." I replied that they were both good English but that "In so doing" sounded rather more formal. I'm now doubting my own advice. What do other native speakers of BrE or AmE think? (Of course there are ways of avoiding the expression altogether.)
Alan Jones
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I diligently shall investigate that issue and promptly shall report.

A German friend recently asked me whether "In so doing, the President broke the convention that ..." was acceptable English, ... What do other native speakers of BrE or AmE think? (Of course there are ways of avoiding the expression altogether.)

A toss-up of acceptability.

Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
A toss-up of acceptability. =20

In today's British English I'd say that "In so doing" was slightly more formal.
=20
Robin=20
Herts, England=20
A German friend recently asked me whether "In so doing, the President broke the convention that ..." was acceptable English, ... sounded rather more formal. I'm now doubting my own advice. What do other native speakers of BrE or AmE think?

It sounds slightly more formal to me (AmE).

John Varela
Trade NEW lamps for OLD for email.
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