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Of all the writing errors you can make, misplaced modifiers are among the most likely to confuse your readers.

1)What are the italicised words above? I realsie that there is a relative clause within the phrase...What is it called when you have a clause inside a phrase?

2)What are they modifying?

3)So what is the phrase? Adverbial? If so, answering what?

Thanks a lot.
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Hi Eddie. Let me guess:

Prepositional phrase, acting adjectivally, modifying the subject of the sentence, "modifiers."

I think the structure is similar to "Among Ford products, the Lincoln is most expensive."

- A.
Yeah, I thought it may have either been modifying the subject (adjectivally) or that it was an adverb phrase.

Oh, and one unrelated, simple question....

'I have a fear of his getting angry.'

I have a fear of him getting angry.

Is getting a gerund or participle? Because if it is a gerund, then the pronoun should be in possessive case.

Is it a participle modifying 'him'? Or is it a gerund, that is, the object of the preposition?

Thanks.

P.s. now that I think about it, it not only sounds wrong using 'his' but I'm now pretty sure him is the pronoun which is the object of the preposition and getting angry modifies this.

But I'd still like to see if you agree.
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Eddie88 What is it called when you have a clause inside a phrase?
Hmmm. That's what you get for working from big to small.

Why can't you say, "Of all the writing errors" is a prepositional phrase; "[that] you can make" is a relative clause, referring to "errors"; the whole thing is an adjectival phrase with an embedded / (appended?) relative clause?
Haha, the only reason I ask this is because I know that a noun phrase with a relative clause inside it is called a complex noun phrase, as opposed to a simple noun phrase.

Do you have any thoughts for my following question (same post)?

Cheers.
Eddie88 I know that a noun phrase with a relative clause inside it is called a complex noun phrase
But noun phrases seem to march to a different drummer. How can you assume that an adjectival phrase with a relative clause inside it is called a complex adjectival phrase?
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Eddie88 Do you have any thoughts for my following question (same post)?
I believe we're talking about your original post in this thread. There were three numbered questions. The first one had two parts.

I answered all three in my first post, but missed the second part of #1, about the name of a phrase ending with a relative clause.

I tried to answer that in a separate post. - A.
Eddie88 'I have a fear of his getting angry.'

I have a fear of him getting angry.

Is getting a gerund or participle? Because if it is a gerund, then the pronoun should be in possessive case.

Is it a participle modifying 'him'? Or is it a gerund, that is, the object of the preposition?

P.s. now that I think about it, it not only sounds wrong using 'his' but I'm now pretty sure him is the pronoun which is the object of the preposition and getting angry modifies this.

But I'd still like to see if you agree.
Actually, I don't. My impression is that with this form we always take the "gerund" to be the object, and therefore use the possessive adjective, "his."

If you wish to say, "I have a fear of him (getting angry), then of course the pronoun is the object; but I think you'd need a comma after it to make that clear.

There's no doubt that many people habitually use the sentence in this second way, saying "of him," and not pausing after "him." To these people, "his" sounds strange.
Sorry, I edited the post and wrote it again below.
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