+0
Can I use Present Continuous to express future in complex sentences? For example:

I'm leaving after she arrives.

I'm reading my book before she arrives.
Comments  
No grammatical rule prevents you from that. Native speakers may offer other ways to express your thoughts.

CB
Yes, it's used all the time to express intention.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Grammatically, I am leaving has future meaning. But I am reading my book seems to carry far less future implication than emphasizing present activity?
Maybe I will be reading my book before she arrives?
In that case, it sounds like you want to finish the book before she comes. Maybe it's her book and she'll want to take it back home with her.

Maybe it's your brother, known for stealing other people's desserts. I'm eating my pie before my brother gets here! (So he won't have a change to eat it himself.)
Thanks CB.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Anonymous But I am reading my book seems to carry far less future implication than emphasizing present activity?
Maybe I will be reading my book before she arrives?
That's exactly what I had on my mind, Anon![Y] I don't always know what is on native speakers' minds and that's why I refrained from suggesting it this time. The reason I am reading my book "seems to carry far less future implication than emphasizing present activity" is the fact that the verb to read doesn't indicate motion. The present continuous is most often used with such verbs to refer to the future:

He is coming tonight.
I'm going there tomorrow.

Not always, though: I'm having lunch with him tomorrow.

As there is no partitive case to indicate uncompleted action in English, I would say

I will have read my book before she arrives

to mean that I'll have read the entire book.

CB
My grammar book says:

will be reading my book  denotes 'FUTURE AS A MAITER OF COURSE', whereas am reading my book has the basic meaning of 'FUTURE ARISING FROM PRESENT ARRANGEMENT, PLAN, OR PROGRAMME'. Therefore,
suppose I am playing video games now. In order to give my lady tutor a good impression, I plan to read a book on her imminent arrival. In this case I would use I'm reading my book before she arrives. But If  I normally study between 8-10 pm and she drops in at 9 pm,I would say I will be reading my book before she arrives.

I wonder if the explanation makes sense to native speakers?

Thank you.