A: "This food is hot!"
B: Is the food spicy hot or hot hot?
Are spicy and the first hot in "hot hot" used as adverbs since they imply "spicily hot" and "hotly hot" or are "spicy hot" and "hot hot" compound adjectives that specialize hot into a spicy kind of hot and a hot kind of hot?
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A: "This food is hot!" B: Is the food spicy hot or hot hot? Are spicy and the first hot ... and "hot hot" compound adjectives that specialize hot into a spicy kind of hot and a hot kind of hot?

It's parasitic on ``spicy hotness or a hot hotness?''

A food that has spicy hotness is spicy hot.
So I'd say compound adjective, by analogy with compound noun.

Incidentally the first ``hot'' in ``hot hot'' is narrower than the second : ``hot properly so called'' and ``hot in general,'' respectively.

Ron Hardin
On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
A: "This food is hot!" B: Is the food spicy hot or hot hot? Are spicy and the first hot ... and "hot hot" compound adjectives that specialize hot into a spicy kind of hot and a hot kind of hot?

Wot?
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Ron Hardin filted:
A: "This food is hot!" B: Is the food spicy ... spicy kind of hot and a hot kind of hot?

It's parasitic on ``spicy hotness or a hot hotness?'' A food that has spicy hotness is spicy hot. So I'd say compound adjective, by analogy with compound noun.

I think it's more a matter of amplification...the word "hot" means more than one thing, so the speaker qualifies which is meant: "'spicy' hot or 'hot' hot"..

Cf "funny 'strange' or funny 'ha-ha'?"..
Incidentally the first ``hot'' in ``hot hot'' is narrower than the second : ``hot properly so called'' and ``hot in general,'' respectively.

"Hot qua hot"?...r
A: "This food is hot!" B: Is the food spicy ... spicy kind of hot and a hot kind of hot?

It's parasitic on ``spicy hotness or a hot hotness?''

Pay no attention to the dyslexic behind the curtain.
A food that has spicy hotness is spicy hot.

Do you fail to notice that "hot" is the base and "hotness" a (fairly rare) derivative of it? (The usual nominalization of "hot" is "heat.")
So I'd say compound adjective, by analogy with compound noun. Incidentally the first ``hot'' in ``hot hot'' is narrower than the second : ``hot properly so called'' and ``hot in general,'' respectively. On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
A food that has spicy hotness is spicy hot.

Do you fail to notice that "hot" is the base and "hotness" a (fairly rare) derivative of it? (The usual nominalization of "hot" is "heat.")

So spices produce heat? I hadn't heard that usage. I've heard plenty about spices producing hotness.
Moreover that's technically correct. Hotness is the ratio of the increase in heat to the increase in entropy.
So you see that heat is pretty far down the food chain from hotness.

Nobody mentions entropy and spices.

Ron Hardin
On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
A: "This food is hot!" B: Is the food spicy hot or hot hot? Are spicy and the first hot ... and "hot hot" compound adjectives that specialize hot into a spicy kind of hot and a hot kind of hot?

Take a look at *Contrastive Focus Reduplication in English (The Salad-Salad Paper)*:
in .DOC form at
people.brandeis.edu/~jackendo/redup10g.doc
or
in .HTML form at

or
http://tinyurl.com/4kexw

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Are spicy and the first hot in "hot hot" used as adverbs since they imply "spicily hot" and "hotly hot" or are "spicy hot" and "hot hot" compound adjectives that specialize hot into a spicy kind of hot and a hot kind of hot?

I'd spell them with hyphens and call them compounds.

The Kaibo National Forest is in the Big Rock Candy Mountains. ¬R http://users.bestweb.net/~notr/arkville.html red
A: "This food is hot!" B: Is the food spicy ... spicy kind of hot and a hot kind of hot?

Take a look at *Contrastive Focus Reduplication in English (The Salad-Salad Paper)*: in .DOC form at people.brandeis.edu/~jackendo/redup10g.doc or in .HTML form at http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:ASMtqsmiYoAJ:people.brandeis.edu/~jackendo/redup10g.doc+%22The+SALAD-salad+Paper%22&hl=en or

There's also a corpus of examples at:
http://www.umanitoba.ca/linguistics/russell/redup-corpus.html

The corpus includes one example of "hot hot", but not as a contrast to "spicy hot":
You like it HOT-hot, eh? You like it really hot?
(talking about the weather)
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