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Hi Everyone,

I am new to English Forum. It's nice to meet you all Emotion: smile

I was reading a section on adverbs in my English Grammar book and had a question regarding the positioning of adverbs in sentences.

The book said, " An adverb should try to be close to the verb it modifies"

So what about the sentence I saw on internet below


The virus has been circulating over the past three years in the Northern and Southern hemisphere.


Should the "place adverb" ( In the Northern and Southern hemisphere) come before the time adverb ( over the past three years). By the way, I am not even sure if my categorising of the nature of each phrase is correct or not. Would you guys also correct me if they are incorrect?


Finally, as I really want to have a good command of this language, would you also please help me correct the grammar of what I have typed here.


Thank you very much in advance Emotion: smile I appreciate it a lot Emotion: smile

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KennyLuThe book said, " An adverb should try to be close to the verb it modifies"

Yes...given that sentences are linear and often include multiple adverbials.

KennyLuShould the "place adverb" ( In the Northern and Southern hemisphere) come before the time adverb ( over the past three years).

It is unimportant there, though a careful writer will place the more pertinent adverb nearer the end of the sentence.

KennyLuwould you also please help me correct the grammar of what I have typed here.

OK, but there's not much to correct.

I am new to English Forum. It's nice to meet you all.

I was reading a section on adverbs in my English Grammar book and have a question regarding the positioning of adverbs in sentences.

The book said, "An adverb should try to be close to the verb it modifies".

So, what about the sentence I saw on internet below?


The virus has been circulating over the past three years in the Northern and Southern hemisphere.


Should the place adverb ( "in the Northern and Southern hemisphere") come before the time adverb ("over the past three years"). By the way, I am not even sure if my categorising of the nature of each phrase is correct or not. Would you also correct me if they are incorrect?


Finally, as I really want to have a good command of this language, would you also please help me correct the grammar of what I have typed here?


Thank you very much in advance. I appreciate it a lot.

1 2
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Wouldn't "had" be correct because of parallelism? The question came to him at the time he was reading the book.

Also:

So , what about the sentence I saw on the internet below ?

anonymousThe question came to him at the time he was reading the book.

And he still has the question at the time of writing his post.

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Hi Mister,

Thank you so much for your reply as well as your correction of my sentences. However, I'm still unclear as to which one of the below is more correct.

(This is the original sentence I saw on Internet the other day)

The virus has been circulating over the past three years in the Northern and Southern hemisphere.

(This is the sentence I think also makes sense)

The virus has been circulating in the Northern and Southern hemisphere over the past three years.


Are they equivalent in essence? Do they give different meanings? Shouldn't the place adverb always come before a time adverb (e.g. I saw him "in the park" "yesterday").


Thank you Mister Emotion: smile


Kenny

KennyLuwhich one of the below is more correct.(This is the original sentence I saw on Internet the other day)The virus has been circulating over the past three years in the Northern and Southern hemisphere.(This is the sentence I think also makes sense)The virus has been circulating in the Northern and Southern hemisphere over the past three years.

There is no such thing as 'more correct'; it is either correct or incorrect. Both of those sentences are correct and the word order, as I said before, is unimportant.

KennyLuAre they equivalent in essence? Do they give different meanings?

Yes. No.

KennyLu Shouldn't the place adverb always come before a time adverb (e.g. I saw him "in the park" "yesterday").

No.

I saw him yesterday in the park.

Yesterday I saw him in the park.

Hi Mister,

Thanks once again for your reply. Just one last question.

If the order doesn't matter, I suppose

"I saw him yesterday in the park" is also correct. Would you please help me verify that Emotion: smile ?

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Yes, all of the above are correct and common.

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