+0

In February 2020, she was accused of forgery by the organizers of the Dadashaheb Phalke International Film Festival to tamper a certificate of appreciation by the committee. (from an Indian newspaper)

Is the underlined to-infinitive clause an adverbial clause of reason? I mean, can we write:

In February 2020, she was accused of forgery by the organizers of the Dadashaheb Phalke International Film Festival because she tampered a certificate of appreciation by the committee.

+1

Yes, it's an obvious error by the writer, which wasn't picked up by the editor.

You could re-write it like this:

In February 2020, she was accused of forgery by the organizers of the Dadashaheb Phalke International Film Festival for tampering with a certificate of appreciation by the committee.

The underlined element in this example is an adjunct (your adverbial) of reason.

1 2
Comments  
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Thank you.

BillJYes, it's an obvious error by the writer, which wasn't picked up by the editor.

Do you mean to-infinitive clauses cannot be used as adverbial clauses of reason.

As far as I know, we can use to-infinitive clauses as adverbial clauses of purpose, manner and as adverbial result clauses.

1) I came here to see you. (adverbial clause of purpose; to see=in order to see)

2) Kate Garraway has broken her social media silence to send a sweet message to Eamonn Holmes.​ (adverbial clause of manner; to send=by sending)

3) They drove so fast as to escape the police car that was chasing them. (adverbial result clause; they drove so fast that they escaped...)

Is my understanding correct?

*In February 2020, she was accused of forgery by the organizers of the Dadashaheb Phalke International Film Festival to tamper a certificate of appreciation by the committee.


There is a grammatical error here, so the underlined infinitival clause isn't an adjunct of anything!

That is why I gave you a corrected version, which does contain an adjunct of reason.

BillJ

Your original sentence contains a grammatical error so there is little point in analysing it.

That is why I gave you a corrected version, which contains an adjunct of reason.

Actually I just wanted to whether we could use to-infinitive clauses as adverbial clauses of reason in some contexts?

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

No. Adjuncts of reason are generally expressed with PPs, headed by words like "because" or "since" etc.

I can't play because I've got to work.

Since you're an expert, take a look at this.

As high winds are forecast, the road is closed.

BillJ

No. Adjuncts of reason are generally expressed with PPs, headed by words like "because" or "since" etc.

I can't play because I've got to work.

Since you're an expert, take a look at this.

As high winds are forecast, the road is closed.

By "PP", do you mean "prepositional phrase"?

Yes, PP=preposition phrase

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

Thank you very much.

Show more