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Hello, I am studying for my exam of English syntax and I have some problems. Could you please give me an example of restrictive and non-restrictive adverbial clause and also -ing concessive clause? I can not find them anywhere. I would be very glad if you could help me.
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AnonymousHello, I am studying for my exam of English syntax and I have some problems. Could you please give me an example of restrictive and non-restrictive adverbial clause and also -ing concessive clause? I can not find them anywhere. I would be very glad if you could help me.

In Bristol, there is a house where I lived as a child. (A restrictive adverbial clause of place.)

It was in 1980, the year, when I was born. (A non-restrictive adverbial clause of time.)

He went to work despite being ill. (A non-finite '-ing' clause of concession.)
AnonymousIn Bristol, there is a house where I lived as a child. (A restrictive adverbial clause of place.)
It was in 1980, the year when I was born. (A non-restrictive adverbial clause of time.)

But these are not adverbial clauses, they are restrictive relative clauses modifying the nouns 'house' and 'year'. Adverbial clauses typically modify verbs - but that's not what the subordinate clauses are doing here. Just because the relative words 'where' and 'when' are adverbs of place and time respectively, that doesn't mean the subordinate clauses they introduce are adverbial clauses.

BillJ
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BillJAdverbial clauses typically modify verbs
Hi, Bill.
That was my thought. It seems like a good functional definition.
I notice that this year it's very popular to say "X is an adverbial." Drives me crazy!

The poster asks for very specific things. I've struggled for three years to understand which terms define a phrase/clause functionally, and which ones define it based on what's in the phrase itself. I've almost given up.
(If we try to sharpen our tools, we're being prescriptivist.) Emotion: rolleyes

- A.
@ BillJ

Not only relative pronouns but also relative adverbs such as where, when introduce relative clauses. So the question is: What kind of the clause are the relatives clauses where I lived as a child and when I was born ? Are they adjectival or noun clauses? In my opinion, they are not. Are they adverbials? In my opinion, they are. Now, the function which those adverbials fulfil here is not that of simply modifying a house and the year. In my opinion, again, those adverbials refer or rather qualify main clauses there is a house and It was in 1980 which both have the finite verbs is and was.
I find it curious. In the example sentences, both "where" and "when" are relative pronouns which are nouns.
How do you see one being restrictive and the other not?

<<<“In Bristol, there is a house where I lived as a child. (A restrictive adverbial clause of place.)
It was in 1980, the year when I was born. (A non-restrictive adverbial clause of time.)” >>>>

If I am not incorrect, I believe both are restrictive without a comma. By the way, they look more like a noun clause than adverbial. That's my take.
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dimsumexpress I believe both are restrictive without a comma.
I agree with you, dimsum. That struck me when I first read it, but it slipped through the cracks.
To be restrictive, the comma would have to come after "year," and then it would make no sense.
I take "the year when I was born" as an appositive, and "when I was born" as a restrictive relative clause. Right?

Re the type of clause, if they modify nouns (as Bill and I agree that they do), wouldn't that make them adjectival?

Rgdz, - A.
When and where in my sentences are relative adverbs. Full stop. You've removed the comma from my original post and tried to put me into your syntactic shoes. I strongly disagree.
AnonymousIn Bristol, there is a house where I lived as a child.
It was in 1980, the year, when I was born.
He went to work despite being ill.
You're right about the comma in the second one, Anon. I apologize.
Now that I've gone back to the original, I remember seeing the two commas in that sentence.

Perhaps Bill instinctively removed the comma after "the year," and dimsum simply copied from him.

I'm still not comfortable with the analysis.
It was in 1980, the year, when I was born.

"The year" sounds like an appositive. "The year, not the decade," or something like that.
It was in 1980 that I was born.

1) It happened in Bristol, where I was born.

2) It happened in the town where I was born.

I'd say #1 is non-restrictive and #2 is restrictive. I have yet to be convinced that either relative clause is adverbial, but I'm willing to call "where" a relative adverb - until someone tells me I'm wrong. Emotion: happy
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