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The driver was found to have above the permitted level of alcohol in his blood.
Is "found" a catenative here?
Is the underlined part of the sentence the object? No.
Strange.
"above the permitted level of alcohol in his blood" is an adverbial I think.
"above" I have a nagging doubt that it should be a preposition. But then the underlined is a prepositional phrase and a noun phrase and a adverbial phrase.
Am I right?
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Hi Incho,

I've certainly found I'm not at ALL a grammar geek since I've come here, because I don't do well with the types of questions you asked here, but use this as a model:

The student was found to have a mouse in his pocket. Same structure, but "above the permitted level of alcohol" is replaced with the simple word mouse. That seems like an object to me.

or if it were some candy - how much candy? some. how much alcohol? above the permitted level.

You can teach ME how to solve these things. I just know what sounds like good writing - I can't name the parts like you can.
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The passive of find, know, say, report, see, hear, discover and similar verbs can be thought of a catenatives, yes. They are followed by the infinitive.

The driver was [found / known / said / reported / seen / heard / discovered] to [be / have / ...]

The driver [had / was found to have] more than the permitted level ...

would be better.

The implication is more alcohol than the permitted level of alcohol. This noun phrase (which includes a comparative structure) is the object of to have.

CJ
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Comments  
I think It is the object omitted

(things) above the permitted level of alcohol

I know (things) about him.

thus,above the permitted level of alcohol is a preposition phrase.

The driver was found to have (things) above the permitted level of alcohol in his blood

I hope you get satisfaction.
The driver was found to have above the permitted level of alcohol in his blood.
Sorry for my butting in. I'm not a specialist, Inchoateknowledge, but I'd have thought that the part in pink is a noun phrase (the head of which is alcohol), which functions as an object of the verb have. Cannot above the permitted level of be considered as a quantifier...?
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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.