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a. He only made one error in which he let the manager get the better of him



b. He only made one error in where he let the manager get the better of him



c. He only made one error in when he let the manager get the better of him



d. He only made one error by letting the manager get the better of him

Are they all OK?

Are they interchangeable?

Which do you think is best?

Thanks











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I'd say only d is correct. But I'd prefer

He only made one mistake/error when he let the manager get the better of him. (without the in)

But, for me, that sentence is still not very clear (it's potentially ambiguous) so I'd just say

His only mistake/error was letting the manager get the better of him.
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Ivanhr's suggestion is very good. However, given the original choices, I would place only nearer to what it is modifying: He made only one error.....
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Comments  
Sorry, I wrote them incorrectly. Same question?

a. He only made one error in which he let the manager get the better of him



b. He only made one error where he let the manager get the better of him



c. He only made one error when he let the manager get the better of him



d. He only made one error by letting the manager get the better of him
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English 1b3 - why don't you buy a good English grammar usage guide and read it thoroughly? The questions you repeatedly ask are covered in detail by many such books, so you should be able to learn at least the absolute basic English grammar from them.

BillJ
As a native English speaker, I'd phrase it "his only error was letting the manager get the better of him". As I'm reading this I'm noticing this was last posted a year ago, but a bit of clarity never goes astray.