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Hi,
is it true that most of adverbs don't form comparative and superlative? Emotion: thinking

Thank you
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This is not a clear question. Can you give us some examples. I would guess to say yes based on what ithought you question is...
MagdaHi,
is it true that most of adverbs don't form comparative and superlative? Emotion: thinking

Thank you

Your question is too vague and broad. can you give a few examples? I would guess to say "yes" based on what I thought the text of your question was.
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Hi, Goodman. I know how to form comperatives and superlatives of adverbs. However, I found this statement in my grammar book and it made me stop for a moment. I know that some adverbs cannot be compared, e.g today, now, yet, already, just, etc. However, I am not sure if "some" can be called "most". But of course, there may be more adverbs that cannot be compared.

Magda
MagdaHi, Goodman. I know how to form comperatives and superlatives of adverbs. However, I found this statement in my grammar book and it made me stop for a moment. I know that some adverbs cannot be compared, e.g today, now, yet, already, just, etc. However, I am not sure if "some" can be called "most". But of course, there may be more adverbs that cannot be compared.

Magda

Then allow me to ask this.

In your opinion, do you think More and most can be considered a comparative and superlative?

I think so. But not "some" and "most".
Goodman, by most I refered to the statament "most adverbs aren't compared". I know, though, that some adverbs can't be compared (e.g today, now, finally), therefore I asked if we can say that "some" can be called "most".
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Magda, are you comparing adjectives with adverbs?

For example, you can say he is happy, happier, or happiest. But if you say "He is happily married" you can't say "happilier" or happiliest." You have to modify it with something else like "even more happily."

That project was big. That one was bigger. That was the biggest. (Three forms of the adjective "big.") But take adverb "hugely." The project was hugely successful. But not hugier successful or hugiest successful. (That project was even more sucessful and other one was the most successful of all.)

Does that help answer your question?
Some adverbs can be put into the comparative and superlative.

The project was the most hugely successful project of all.
This project was more hugely successful than that project.

I drive fast.
She drives faster.
They drive the fastest.

She is more happily married than he is.
Fast/faster is a great examle of one that can be put into the comparitive.

But "more happily" is not a comparative form of the word "happily."

I wonder if we can come up with a rule? Are there ANY adverbs that end in -ly that we can make a comparitive form out of?
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