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Hello,

Would someone please tell me what is the correct position of the adverb <dynamically> in the following sentence:
"A resource allocation procedure is responsible for establishing the set of the eligible activities for execution at each decision point dynamically".

The adverb <dynamically> actually describes the establishment process of the set. Is the sentence grammatically correct?

Thanks.
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Yes, it could be written as you have it, but given that you state:
kaissThe adverb actually describes the establishment process of the set.
You could rewrite it, and I prefer it, like this:

A resource allocation procedure is responsible for dynamically establishing the set of the eligible activities for execution at each decision point.
Thanks Shwan79 Emotion: big smile
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Hi Shawn79,

Would you please help me in this also. I need to rewrite the following sentence please in order to let it sounds somehow more formal:
"The problem of the building construction industry is that the way a building is constructed in addition to the surrounding conditions hold a big deal of uncertainty and ambiguities".

What would you suggest me?

Thanks,
kaiss
A direct object (noun) must follow the preposition "for", but you are using "establishing" as a verb; it's a noun.

Restate is as something like: "...for (the) dynamic establishment of..."

In example:
His past is responsible for his dramatic singing. --Correct
His past is responsible for his singing dramatically. -- Incorrect

The second example is incorrect, because there is no subject to go with "singing dramatically"; no one is doing the action.
A correct usage would be: He sings dramatically.

I'm trying to say in order to use an adverb, you must have a verb and therefore a subject to commit the act the verb represents. "For" may not precede a verb, though we like to say it that way.
kaiss"The problem of the building construction industry is that the way a building is constructed in addition to the surrounding conditions hold a big deal of uncertainty and ambiguities".
"Present much" maybe? There's a word I can't think of at the moment. I might think of it later. But you could say:

The building construction industry's problem is that the way a building is constructed in addition to the surrounding conditions presents much uncertainty and ambiguity.

I can't vouch for the sentence as a whole, since I don't fully understand what is meant by the uncertainty and ambiguity. Emotion: wink
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Shawn79I don't fully understand what is meant by the uncertainty and ambiguity
For example, the skill level of the work labors, the technical condition of the used production machines and their percentage of failure, and the effect of weather. The values of those factors are ambiguous and we can't be certain of their values. But, the construction manager needs these values in order to schedule and plan the building project. And here's the problem: the planner is planning and scheduling the project based on values that are ambitious and uncertain Emotion: smile

What you think?
AnonymousA direct object (noun) must follow the preposition "for"
Anonymous"For" may not precede a verb
Thanks for your answer. Actually, I'm confused now and I don't know how to use the preposition "for" anymore. Well, here are examples of how I used it in my text:
- a standard for aiding
- priorities rules for solving
- candidates for receiving
- for finding
- methodology for simulating

Do you think that I have to rephrase all my sentence in order to change those verbs into equivalent nouns?

BR
kaissDo you think that I have to rephrase all my sentence in order to change those verbs into equivalent nouns?
No, it's because of the presence of the adverb "dynamically" that he is saying that "establishing" is a verb. You can have a gerund after "for". Regarding that my English textbook states that the "-ing" form following "for" is used to describe "purpose".

I read an article by a linguist who suggests that adverbs can modify a gerund. In his analysis the modification is "internal" to the verb and therefore the phrase as a whole functions as a noun. According to this reasoning, "for" could be followed by "dynamically establishing".

I'm not saying Anonymous is wrong, only that his point is a technicality that not all grammarians agree with. If you wish to be understood and speak in a manner common to native speakers, "for dynamically establishing" is an acceptable phrase.
kaiss- a standard for aiding - priorities rules for solving - candidates for receiving - for finding - methodology for simulating
In each case you are describing the purpose of a noun. They are acceptable. These don't have adverbs so they're not even at issue.
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